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Testing is Not Just for Code. September 16, 2009

Posted by mwidlake in Architecture, VLDB.
Tags: , , ,
7 comments

Someone I am currently working with has a wonderful tag line in her emails:

Next time we want to release untested, why don’t we just release undeveloped?

Testing is not limited to testing code of course. I have recently posted about how a backup is not a backup until you have tested it with a practice recovery.  How you think the database will work by looking at the data dictionary is just a nice theory until you run some actual tests to see how the database responds, as I have been doing with Histograms lately. Sadly, you could even say an Oracle feature is not an Oracle feature until you have tested it.

In my experience, this is particularly true when you test the edges of Oracle, when you are working on VLDBs {Very Large DataBases}.

Last month Jonathan Lewis posted about a 2TB ASM disc size bug, where if you allocated a disc over 2TB to ASM, it would fill it up, wrap around and write over the begining of the file. This week I heard from some past colleagues of mine that they hit this very same bug.
With these very same colleagues we hit a big in 10.1 where you could not back up a tablespace over 8TB in size with RMAN {I can’t give you a bug number for it as we were working with HP/Oracle direct at the time and they “handled it internally”, But when I mentioned it to him, Jonathan found a similar one, bug 5448714 , which stated a 4TB limit on backups. It could be the same bug}.

Yet another VLDB issue was we wanted to move just under one thousand tablespaces from one database to another {again, 10.1}, using transportable tablespaces. We tried to use the utility for checking you are working on a consistent set of tablespaces, but it could not cope with that many. But to plug them into the new tablespace you have to export the metadata and we found a 4000 character limit on the variable stating the tablespaces to transport. That’s 2.3 characters per tablespace, as you need comas to delimit them…Yes, you could manage if you renamed all tablespaces to AA, AB, AC…BA.,BB, BC etc.  If memory servers, the problem was with data pump export and we reverted to old style export which did not have the problem.

Another limit I’ve blogged on is that the automated stats job chokes on very large objects.

Some Data dictionary views can become very slow if you have several tens of thousands of tables/extents/tablespace/indexes

I can appreciate the issues and problems Oracle has with testing their code base, it is vast and people use the software in odd ways and it has to run on many platforms. You might also feel I am being picky by saying Oracle breaks a little when you have 8TB tablespaces or a thousand tablespaces. But

  • Oracle will say in big, glossy presentations, you can build Petabyte and Exabyte databases with Oracle {and have a product called Exadata, don’t forget}.
  • More and more customers are reaching these sizes as data continues to grow, for many site, faster than mores law.
  • Some of these limits appear with databases well below a Petabyte (say a tiddly small 50TB one :-) ).

I’ve been running into these issues with VLDBs since Oracle 7 and they are often with pretty fundamental parts of the system, like creating and backing up tablespaces! I think it is poor show that it is so obvious that Oracle has been weak in testing with VLDB-sized database before release. 

I wonder whether, with 11gR2, Oracle actually tested some petabyte data sizes to see if it all works? After all, as is often said, disk is cheap now, I’m sure they could knock one up quite quickly…

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