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Friday Philosophy – Madness demands Attention May 28, 2010

Posted by mwidlake in Architecture, Friday Philosophy.
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2 comments

Many years ago I had a good friend who was a psychiatric nurse. We were talking about his job once and he was saying how some patients just took up much more time than others. These were generally the ones who would be deemed “the most mad” in a non-clinical manner {and is pretty much how my friend the psychiatric nurse put it}. These patient’s actions or need for intervention would put demands on the staff far more than other patients. As a result, all the nurses tended to get to know (or know of) such patients better than others.

I thought of this the other day when a few of us were talking about some awful bit of application we were concerned about. This thing inserts rows from a MSSQL database into a table in an Oracle database. Triggers on the initial table fire and populate another table, in a 1-to-many relationship. This second table also has a trigger on it that further inserts into another set of tables. A regular process then aggregates this data – and sticks it back into the MSSQL database it came from.

Said process is done as a single transaction for all rows inserted for the day. Irrespective of the growth in rows. Or the fact that one source “application” has grown to 10 and soon will grow to 50. All rows in one transaction. The intermediate tables are never cleared out and get bigger and bigger. No one else needs any of this data in the Oracle side of the system.

There are several “madnesses” to this process – why put it into Oracle only to put it back in the source system, why use a busy production system to hold and process transient data, why no clean up, why are the records not processed in batches, the cascading triggers magnifies transaction data volumes…

This process is well-known in our group. I’ve been involved. Both the guys I was talking to have been involved. I can see from my desk 4 or 5 other people who have been roped into bullying this process thought before now. In fact, I reckon half the department have had to work on this damned thing at some point.

Can you see why I was reminded of my conversation with my old nurse friend?

The application is simply mad. And as a result it is demanding not only on our database but on all of the team, as so many of us have had to get involved working on it. We have all got to know it so well.

I’m glad to say that treatment for the application is planned and, hopefully, it will soon be a lot happier.

So will we.

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