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Oracle Nostalgia December 15, 2011

Posted by mwidlake in database design, development.
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16 comments

When preparing the material for my “Oracle Lego – an introduction to Database Design” presentation for the UKOUG last week, I was looking back at my notes from a course on the topic from “a few years back”.¬†There were a few bits which made me smile.

Oracle’s [SQL] implementation conforms to ANSI standard, although referential integrity will not be enforced until version 7

Any other old geezers having flashbacks? I am so glad my first major Oracle development project swapped to using a Beta of V7 very early, so we had the integrity turned on during most of development. I had to help a few projects go from V6 to V7 and turn on the RI – it was usually very, very painful. Or impossible. I always think back to those nightmare experiences when some bright spark suggests turning off referential integrity for “ease of development” or “performance” reasons. There are good performance reasons for altering how you implement RI but, as I said during my presentation on database design, I have never, ever, ever seen a system with RI turned off that did not have damaged data.

Oracle’s optimiser is rule-based. Designing efficient queries involves taking advantage of the optimiser behaviour

.

You can tell this course was run in the UK due to the lack of ‘z’ in ‘optimiser’ :-). How many of use can now make a stab at the seven or eight significant rules from the 15 (16, 17 as versions advanced) in the list? Several rules were to do with Clusters so you did not care. Let’s think, what were the main things to keep in mind…

  • most significant table last in the FROM clause and order upwards in the order you wanted to visit {most significant being the one you felt you could most efficiently do the first filter against}
  • ¬†WHERE clauses ordered downwards in the order you wanted them to be applied.
  • Order of preference to identify a row was something like ROWID, primary key, unique key, full non-unique key, partial unique key, partial non-unique key, full index scan, full table scan.
  • Disable index access by adding 0 to numeric columns and concatinating null to varchars.

I’ve not checked back in the manuals (I have a set of the V7 on my laptop) so I’m probably wrong.

Storage….selecting suitable values for storage parameters … will improve the final performance of the database

Considering the “suitable values for storage parameters” was perhaps my first real conscious step into being a performance/design guy {I was lucky to be on a project where designing for the RBO and matching those rules was just part of being any developer}, but the calculating of rows-per-block, initial and next extent, pctincrease (not always zero you know), initrans/maxtrans, segment to tablespace size… I learnt all about that and had spreadsheets for it all.

Now of course, all of the above about storage (and RBO) has pretty much disappeared. Oracle has made some of the contents of my brain redundant.

But some things have not changed at all in 18 years:

Users can be relied upon to know what they do NOT want, not what they want, which {unfortunately} is the premise from which analysis starts)

I think the above is the fundamental issue from which all iterative design methodologies spring. ie do not believe what the user says they want, show them something and fix it. It is probably human nature that we are not well able to express what we want but have no problem pointing out something is not at all what we want :-). Add in all the issues in respect of forgetting about the exceptions, assumed knowledge, incompatible vocabularies (the words your users say to you are as confusing as the techno-babble you fire back at them) and all analysis is fundamentally flawed.

Do some analysis – but then prototype like crazy. With real users.

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