jump to navigation

A couple of up-coming user group meetings August 18, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in Meeting notes, Presenting, User Groups.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

There are a couple of user group meetings in the UK that I’ll be attending (and talking at) in September.

On the 15th September I’ll be presenting at the UKOUG Database Server SIG in the Oracle London City office, talking about PL/SQL & SQL performance. I’m not exactly sure what I’ll be covering yet, I have a few areas I’d like to talk about so I’ll have to pick one to do it justice. The meeting starts at 09:30 and is of course free to anyone with UKOUG membership (excepting the Bronze membership which only a few people have) – anyone can pay a small fee to come along. Contact the UKOUG or ask me if you want details. I’m pretty sure there will be some of us in a nearby public house after the event too.

The next meeting is the Yorkshire Database meeting on Tuesday 22nd September, from 18:30. This is the third YoDB event and I know they have been very good. I’ll be doing my talk on the fundamentals of Oracle’s architecture. I’m really quite excited about this meeting {and I know it is often a false “sell” thing to say about any IT event} because (a) it is a small, local grass-roots user group that I’ve helped promote and yet will be the first I’ll manage to get to and(b) I was at college in Leeds and so have a soft spot for the place. I still have some friends up there. This event is free to all but you DO have to register using the link above.

As ever, it’s great to meet people so please come over and say “hi” if you are at either event.

I’m hoping the postponed cluboracle meeting will happen in September too but either a new date has not been announced or it went by me.

If you want to see what events I’ll be at in the later quarter of the year, you can check out the “appearances and meetings” tab. It’s mostly smaller things like OOW and UKOUG Tech15 🙂

Friday Philosophy – Building for the Future August 14, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in Architecture, development, Friday Philosophy.
Tags: , ,
2 comments

I started my Oracle working life as a builder – a Forms & Reports Builder (briefly on SQL*Forms V2.3 but thankfully within a month or two we moved up to SQL*Forms V3, SQL*reportwriter V1.1 and SQL*Menu 5 – who remembers SQL*Menu?). Why were we called Builders? I guess as you could get a long way with those tools by drawing screens, utilising the (pretty much new) RI in the underlying Oracle V7 to enforce simple business rules and adding very simple triggers – theoretically not writing much in the way of code. It was deemed to be more like constructing stuff out of bits I guess. But SQL*Forms V3 had PL/SQL V1 built in and on that project we used it a *lot*.

I had been an “Analyst Programmer” for 3 years before then and I’ve continued to be a developer/programmer/constructor-of-code on and off over the intervening couple of decades. I’m still a developer at times. But sometimes I still think of it as being a “builder” as, if you do it write {sorry, little word-play joke there} you are using bits of existing stuff and code designs/patterns you know work well and constructing your system. The novel part, the bit or bits that have never been done before (at least by me), the “architecting” of those units into something interestingly different or the use of improved programming features or techniques vary from almost-none to a few percent. That is the part which I have always considered true “Software Development”.

So am I by implication denigrating the fine and long-standing occupation of traditional builders? You know, men and women who know what a piece of two-by-four is and put up houses that stay put up? No. Look at the below.
House_and_odd_feature

This is part of my neighbour Paul’s house. He is a builder and the black part in the centre with the peaked roof is an extension he added a few years back, by knocking his garage down. The garage was one of three, my two were where the garage doors you can see are and to the left. So he added in his two-story extension, with kitchen below and a very nice en-suite bedroom above, between his house and my ratty, asbestos-riddle garages. Pretty neat. A few years later he knocked down my garages and built me a new one with a study on top (without the asbestos!) and it all looks like it was built with his extension. Good eh? But wait, there is more. You will have noticed the red highlight. What is that white thing?

Closer in - did he forget some plumbing?

Closer in – did he forget some plumbing?


This pipe goes clean through the house

This pipe goes clean through the house

When I noticed that white bit after Paul had finished his extension I figured he had planned more plumbing than he put in. I kept quiet. Then, when he had built my new garage and study, I could not help ask him about the odd plumbing outlet. So he opened it. And it goes through the dividing wall all the way through to the other side of the house. Why?

“Well Martin, putting in cables and pipes and s**t into an existing house that go from one side to the other, especially when there is another building next door, as a real pain in the a**e. It does my ‘ead in. So when a build something that is not detached, I put in a pipe all the way through. Now if I need to run a cable from one side of the house to the other, I have my pipe and I know it is straight, clean, and sloping every so slightly downwards”. Why downwards? “Water Martin. You don’t want water sitting in that pipe!”.

I’ve noticed this about builders. When I’ve had work done that is good, there is at least one person on the team who thinks not just about how to erect or do what needs to be done today, they do indeed think about what you will need after the build is done, or in a few years. Such as hanging doors so they do not smack into the cupboards you will put in next… *sigh*. Paul is the thinking guy in his little team. I suspect one of the others is pretty smart too.

But isn’t this what the architect is for? To think about living with the building? Well, despite the 7 years plus needed to become a true architect (as that term really means, not as some stolen label for software designers with too much ego) I’ve had builders spot the pragmatic needs a couple of times that the architect missed.

And as I think we would all agree, a good software developer always has an eye on future maintenance and modification of the software they develop. And they want to create something that fits in the existing system and looks right. So just like my builder neighbour does.

I’m not a software architect. I’m a code builder. And I’m proud of it.