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Friday Philosophy – Building for the Future August 14, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in Architecture, development, Friday Philosophy.
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I started my Oracle working life as a builder – a Forms & Reports Builder (briefly on SQL*Forms V2.3 but thankfully within a month or two we moved up to SQL*Forms V3, SQL*reportwriter V1.1 and SQL*Menu 5 – who remembers SQL*Menu?). Why were we called Builders? I guess as you could get a long way with those tools by drawing screens, utilising the (pretty much new) RI in the underlying Oracle V7 to enforce simple business rules and adding very simple triggers – theoretically not writing much in the way of code. It was deemed to be more like constructing stuff out of bits I guess. But SQL*Forms V3 had PL/SQL V1 built in and on that project we used it a *lot*.

I had been an “Analyst Programmer” for 3 years before then and I’ve continued to be a developer/programmer/constructor-of-code on and off over the intervening couple of decades. I’m still a developer at times. But sometimes I still think of it as being a “builder” as, if you do it write {sorry, little word-play joke there} you are using bits of existing stuff and code designs/patterns you know work well and constructing your system. The novel part, the bit or bits that have never been done before (at least by me), the “architecting” of those units into something interestingly different or the use of improved programming features or techniques vary from almost-none to a few percent. That is the part which I have always considered true “Software Development”.

So am I by implication denigrating the fine and long-standing occupation of traditional builders? You know, men and women who know what a piece of two-by-four is and put up houses that stay put up? No. Look at the below.
House_and_odd_feature

This is part of my neighbour Paul’s house. He is a builder and the black part in the centre with the peaked roof is an extension he added a few years back, by knocking his garage down. The garage was one of three, my two were where the garage doors you can see are and to the left. So he added in his two-story extension, with kitchen below and a very nice en-suite bedroom above, between his house and my ratty, asbestos-riddle garages. Pretty neat. A few years later he knocked down my garages and built me a new one with a study on top (without the asbestos!) and it all looks like it was built with his extension. Good eh? But wait, there is more. You will have noticed the red highlight. What is that white thing?

Closer in - did he forget some plumbing?

Closer in – did he forget some plumbing?


This pipe goes clean through the house

This pipe goes clean through the house

When I noticed that white bit after Paul had finished his extension I figured he had planned more plumbing than he put in. I kept quiet. Then, when he had built my new garage and study, I could not help ask him about the odd plumbing outlet. So he opened it. And it goes through the dividing wall all the way through to the other side of the house. Why?

“Well Martin, putting in cables and pipes and s**t into an existing house that go from one side to the other, especially when there is another building next door, as a real pain in the a**e. It does my ‘ead in. So when a build something that is not detached, I put in a pipe all the way through. Now if I need to run a cable from one side of the house to the other, I have my pipe and I know it is straight, clean, and sloping every so slightly downwards”. Why downwards? “Water Martin. You don’t want water sitting in that pipe!”.

I’ve noticed this about builders. When I’ve had work done that is good, there is at least one person on the team who thinks not just about how to erect or do what needs to be done today, they do indeed think about what you will need after the build is done, or in a few years. Such as hanging doors so they do not smack into the cupboards you will put in next… *sigh*. Paul is the thinking guy in his little team. I suspect one of the others is pretty smart too.

But isn’t this what the architect is for? To think about living with the building? Well, despite the 7 years plus needed to become a true architect (as that term really means, not as some stolen label for software designers with too much ego) I’ve had builders spot the pragmatic needs a couple of times that the architect missed.

And as I think we would all agree, a good software developer always has an eye on future maintenance and modification of the software they develop. And they want to create something that fits in the existing system and looks right. So just like my builder neighbour does.

I’m not a software architect. I’m a code builder. And I’m proud of it.

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Comments»

1. Narendra - August 17, 2015

But isn’t this what the architect is for? To think about living with the building? Well, despite the 7 years plus needed to become a true architect (as that term really means, not as some stolen label for software designers with too much ego) I’ve had builders spot the pragmatic needs a couple of times that the architect missed.

Not sure about 7 years but it seems only those who can blabber on about java/.NET/Fusion Middleware are considered as “architects”. Guess what happens when such architects “design” a database-driven application?
I am jealous of you for being able to say that you are proud of being a code builder…

mwidlake - August 17, 2015

I’m referring to real architects – people qualified to make constructions such as houses, bridges and power stations…. From the Wikipedia entry for Architecture:

“In most developed countries, only qualified people with appropriate license, certification, or registration with a relevant body, often governmental may legally practice architecture”

To become a real architect in the UK it typically requires you to do 3 years BA or BSc, often with a year’s work splitting that three years or after it, then 2 years getting a Masters and then another 2 year’s experience to get a certificate as an accredited Architect. And that is as the lowest-of-the-low architect, you can spend another 10, 15 years getting qualified enough to be the lead architect on a large building. It is supposed to be a legally protected term.

And then you get people with a handful of year’s casual development experience and maybe some certificates from some training company or the owning software company for courses (that almost no one fails) in writing software, calling themselves “architects”. Pah! It’s insulting.

NB if you look hard enough, you will probably find evidence of me calling myself a something architect, maybe a performance architect. Ooops. I apologise for that 🙂

Being slightly more serious, maybe I am proud to be a code builder as it is something I only do sometimes now, not 8am-6pm 5 days a week (maybe 6), month after month, year after year…
I loved driving a digger for a few days but, after a week of it, I was starting to get a little bored. So doing that as a job probably quickly gets dull.


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