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Sourdough – Making a Loaf January 19, 2021

Posted by mwidlake in Baking, off-topic, Private Life.
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4 comments

<<– Creating the Sourdough Starter

Nothing beats fresh, home made bread

Anyone who follows me on Twitter knows I like making sourdough bread. For me, a sourdough loaf is a real treat. I love the combination of a thick, crunchy crust and the soft, strong-flavoured inside. I’ve been asked a few times how I make my bread and I keep saying I will write it up. This blog post is the fulfilment of that promise.

Making sourdough is a longer, more complex baking process than most modern versions of baking bread, but it is actually a very old method of baking and was probably the main method used by the peasant and working classes over the last few hundred years. It takes several hours to make sourdough. I start mine in the evening and bake it in the morning.

Work is stressful (even working in I.T. from home), this pandemic is stressful, baking a nice loaf of bread helps balance that stress.

A key part of the process is that you need a “starter”, a mixture of flour, water, and actively growing yeast. I did a long and detailed post on creating a starter about a month or so ago. If you created a starter then and have been feeding it since, it’s well past time to make a loaf!

Get the Starter Active

If the starter mixture is in the fridge, take it out of the fridge several hours before you are going to use it. If I am making my dough in the evening (my usual method so it can prove overnight) I take the starter out the fridge about noon.

A few hours before you are going to make your dough (usually 6 hours or so for me), mix up 200 grams of strong, white bread flour with tepid water so it is a similar consistency to porridge, add it to the starter and give it a good stir.

This should help get the starter really active and, after a couple of hours, you should see bubbles in the mixture and the volume will increase. I do not seal the jar during this process, I leave it with the lid over the top of the jar but not clipped or screwed down.

Making the Initial Dough

I’ll give you two recipes for making the dough. The first is from a man called Paul Hollywood, who is a very well known and successful baker in the UK. He is one of the judges on “The Great British Bake off“, which is one of the most popular TV programs in the UK. I know the program has been syndicated across the globe, with over 25 countries showing their own version, and a couple showing the UK original. The second recipe is mine, which is derived from Paul Hollywood’s. I increased the size of the loaf as I wanted something to provide sandwiches for 2 people for 2 days and I found a little more salt and a lower percentage of starter gave results I preferred. Less starter seems to give a better final rise to the loaf. Please note – Paul Hollywood is a considerably better baker than I! Perhaps try his recipe first.

This Kenwood Chef is 40 years old!

Paul Hollywood recipe

  • 375g Strong white bread flour
  • 250g sourdough starter
  • 7g salt
  • 130-175 ml tepid water
  • a teaspoon of olive oil

Martin Widlake recipe

  • 500g strong white bread flour
  • 200g sourdough starter
  • 10g salt (but no more!)
  • 7g sugar
  • 200-220ml tepid water
  • a teaspoon of olive oil

 

 

The below is based on my recipe

I have a little plastic jug for measuring the water. Before I put any water in it I put the 10 grams of normal, fine table salt (1). Do not go above 10g of salt in 700g total flour & starter as too much salt inhibits the rise of the loaf. I’m adding about as much salt as you can without this happening.  I also add a teaspoon of sugar (7 grams) as I feel it balances the sour of the loaf and slightly boosts the loaf flavour. Skip this if you like.

I then put 500 grams of strong bread flour into the mixer bowl (see later for some variations to 500g of flour). As I add the flour I also dribble in the salt/sugar mix. This is to help it all mix in evenly. I found that if I just chucked the salt in after all the flour, again the rise could be problematic and the bread seemed to be a bit patchy in it’s flavour. Give the flour with the salt/sugar in a quick swirl with a spoon or something.

I now add 200 grams of sourdough mixture and about 100ml of the tepid water. I do not add it all as I use a food mixer to initially combine my dough. We have a Kenwood Chef that is 40+ years old. To make bread dough in a food mixer you need a dough hook. The one you see in the picture by the recipes is only a few years old, it is coated with Teflon to help the dough to not stick to it.

The mixer can throw little fountains of dry ingredients out of the bowl so I put a towe over the whole thing. If you do this, make absolutely sure the towel is not going to get caught on the dough hook/mixer! With the mixer on it’s lowest setting, I slowly add more of the water to each side of the bowl so that the ingredients combine. I have found that as the dough mixture gets towards the consistency I want, or is damper than I am aiming for, it wraps around the dough hook and no longer mixes! It just wizzes around with the hook.  This is why I added the water slowly and keep about 20-30ml in reserve. Then, when all the ingredients are well mixed but it is not quite forming a single ball, I add the last of the water and keep the mixer running until the dough does wrap around the hook and stay on it. Take it off the hook and make it into a rough ball, as shown In the picture of the mixer.

You can mix it all by hand, which is fun, but your hands get really messy and it takes longer. If you do mix it all by hand, add the water bit by bit until the dough is quite sticky.

I now put a little olive oil, half a teaspoon is all, on a thoroughly cleaned work surface and spread it around  into a 20-30cm circle. I drop the dough in the centre of this and I knead it by hand to finish it off and get a smooth consistency in the dough. Different people like to mix their dough in different ways. I push into it with the heel of my hand, stretching it against the work surface, and then fold it over a little and push into it again. I do this with just the one hand in a regular rhythm of about one one push a second, slowly rotating the dough ball and moving it around so I am working all of the ball. I swap hands occasionally for a full upper-body workout…

Other people slap the dough onto the work surface or throw it down, others squidge it out with both hands and then fold-and-squidge. Do what seems right to you. There are lots of videos on the internet.

The whole aim is to get all the ingredients mixed in smoothly and keep going until the dough is a little elastic. Apparently the best test as to whether you have worked the dough enough is that you can stretch some thin with your fingers and see light coming through it. I don’t do this, it does not seem to work well with my dough, maybe as I do not add enough liquid, maybe because sourdough is a little different. I know it is ready as it…. feels ready. Smooth, not rubbery, but with some stretch to it. Because I use a machine to initially mix and knead the dough I only have to hand knead it for 5 minutes. If you mix the dough by hand then you will need to knead it for 10, 15 minutes. Maybe more.

The whole idea of the kneading is to get some of the protein in the mix, the gluten, to form long chains which give the final loaf it’s structure of a soft and flexible material. If you over knead the dough then the bread will not rise so well and the bread will be rubbery and dense. You don’t want rubbery, dense bread.

Grow my little beauty

Proving the Dough

Once your bread is kneaded to the consistency you want, you have to let it prove – which means left alone to grow. You prove the dough twice.

Use the other half a teaspoon of oil to lightly oil the inside of the mixing bowl. The only reason for the oil is to stop the dough sticking. Put the dough ball into the bowl and cover with clingfilm or similar. I use a clear, plastic shower cap that I can re-use dozens of times as (a) it’s so easy to pop it over the bowl and (b) less plastic waste.

You need to keep the dough at about room temperature – between 18C and 22C – for several hours. Less time if it is warmer, more time if it is cooler. I make my dough about 8-10pm in the evening and leave it overnight, near a radiator that will come on in the morning. This seems to work for my dough.

During the proving stage the yeast in the dough consumes sugars (the sugars come from the starch in the flour being broken down) and they produce carbon dioxide (CO2). this is what makes the dough grow and become soft.

In this first prove of the dough it should doubled to tripled in volume, and become soft and spongey to a light touch. Sticking a finger in it will leave a dent that only partly fills in.

Lightly dust a clean, dry area on your work surface with plain or bread flour and turn the dough out of the bowl it has proved in onto the area. I lightly dust one side of the bowl to stop the dough sticking to it and I ease the dough from the sides and bottom of the bowl with a small, flexible spatula – one of those made of silicon or soft, heat resistant plastic. In the picture above of the dough on the work surface you can see bubbles in it – this is from the CO2.

 

Knocked-back dough ready to go into the banneton

You now need to “knock back” the dough – knead  it all over with your knuckles or, like I do, give it 30 seconds of kneading like you did when you first made the dough. Some instructions tell you to do things like make a ball after knocking it back and  tuck the dough down under the ball and into the bottom of it. I think these are to create little air pockets in the dough that make the large voids you get in posh hippster café sourdough. I don’t want those large voids. I keep the flour dusting to a minimum and push the dough together well to avoid any air gaps or having any folds in the dough which do not “heal” (stick to each other).

Push the dough down into the container

A nicely second-proved dough

You now need to let the dough prove for a second time. I use a “banneton” for this, a special wicker or similar material bowl that is specifically for the final proving of bread. They also impart a nice pattern on the loaf. Dust whatever bowl or banneton you are using well, put the dough into it and push it down firmly. Lightly dust the top and then cover a plastic bag or similar. You want the bag to be above the dough so when it rises it does not contact the bag, as it will stick to it.  I put the showercap I used earlier back over it, with the damp side inwards to stop the top of the bread drying out too much. Put somewhere warm and leave for two hours. If the house is not that warm, I put the oven on and set it to 50C, then turn it off and pop the loaf in that. If you are dead posh you might find your oven has a proving oven compartment or a plate warmer you can use.

After a couple of hours the dough should have risen a little again and have a smooth top. It is now ready to bake

Baking the Bread.

Ready to bake….

A key to getting a good bake where the bread rises evenly and you get a good, strong crust is moisture. You need the atmosphere around the loaf to be damp for the first 20 minutes or so of baking.

I’ve achieved this with two methods – baking in the oven with a tray of water, and using a Dutch Oven.

In the Oven With a Tray of Water.

Pre-heat the oven to 220C and put a shallow tray on the lower shelf.

Heavily dust a baking tray with flour, or flour and semolina (semolina is better at preventing the loaf from sticking, but I find flour on it’s own works just fine and I stopped using the semolina as I’m lazy). Carefully tip the loaf out on the tray and slash the top several times. I have a special, small, gentle serrated knife just for this, it seems to work better than a smooth blade. He’s called Mr Slashy the knife. This scouring allows the crust to expand more easily during the cooking.

 

… but it did not go to plan

Dust lightly with flour and immediately put the loaf into the oven, and put about 500ml of warm water in the shallow tray. This will create steam as the bread cooks.

Cook at 220C for 30 minutes and then turn the oven down to 200C and cook for a further 15-20 minutes. The bread should have risen and turned a lovely golden brown. You can test if it is done by tapping the bottom of the loaf, it should sound hollow. If, like me, you like your bread slightly darker with a stronger crust, extend the higher temperature period from 30 minutes to 35, 40 minutes.

Take the loaf out and move it onto a wire rack to cool.

In the example I show, the loaf is a weird shape. I think this is because, with this loaf, I forgot to put the water in the oven with the loaf, then added cold water to the tray, not warm. As a result there was not enough moisture, the crust formed early and the still-expanding loaf could no longer grow and burst out the side of the crust. If this happens to a lot of your loaves, try scoring more or gently wetting the top and sides of the loaf before the final dust of flour.

It tasted just fine!

In a Dutch Oven.

A Dutch oven is basically a heavy iron or aluminium casserole with a well fitting lid. You bake the bread with the lid on initially to trap moisture. I use an iron casserole dish about 26cm in diameter. The casserole needs to be about 5cm wider than your uncooked loaf, to allow for expansion. If you already have a casserole dish you might need to change your loaf size or the bowl/banneton you prove it in so that the loaf fits!

Pre-heat the oven and the casserole dish to 230C. Yes, 230C. It take about 15 minutes for my casserole to heat up fully.

Take out the casserole and  heavily dust the bottom with flour. You will know it is warm enough as the flour will smoke gently.

As carefully as you can, turn out the loaf into the casserole dish. I turn the banneton upside down and hold the loaf in place with my fingers, shake it slightly until the loaf drops onto my fingers and then I open my fingers to let it drop the 6 inches into the casserole. Do not let your skin touch the casserole dish, it hurts like hell! Slash the top of the loaf several times, again keeping the fingers away from the hot metal.

Take the lid off at 20 minutes

This is the main disadvantage of using a casserole, getting the loaf in and slashing the top is harder and the danger of a nasty burn is ever-present. I have tried turning the loaf out, slashing it and then transferring it to the casserole, but it knocked a fair bit of air out the loaf and reduced the rise.

Cook at 230C for 20 minutes. Remove the lid (the loaf will still be a cream colour) and cook for a further 15-20 mins. Turn the oven down to 160 and cook for a further 15-20 mins. You turn the temperature down more with the casserole as it retains heat for a while.

You might notice my oven says 235 and 165C. My oven temperature is a little cool (I tested with an oven thermometer) so I added 5C. You do get to know your oven when you do baking!

 

 

 

 

 

After 20+15 mins on high, turn down

You loaf should now be dark golden brown. Remove the casserole from the oven. I put a little fan blowing air over the casserole for 5 minutes before I extract the loaf. Using a cloth to protect your fingers, take out the loaf and leave to cool on an a wire rack.

I swapped to the Dutch Oven method as a couple of friends recommended it and the flush of steam from the “oven with a tray” method was making the control panel of my oven go funny. I’ve already had it repaired once.

Having swapped, I think overall the Dutch Oven method gives a better loaf. I have far fewer issues with the loaf rise being uneven and part of the load bursting out the side or the crust “tearing” at the sides.

If I decide to make larger loaves I’ll simply swap to the oven-and-a-tray-of-water method.

 

 

 

Cooling

Once the loaf is out the oven I tend to start losing control of my salivary glands and I am desperate to eat it, so I use a little fan to help it cool in about 1/2 an hour. If you have more will power than I then it takes an hour or so for the loaf to cool naturally.

I love to cut open the loaf and eat it when it is still a little warm. The one disadvantage of this is that the loaf will lose extra moisture as a result of this, so any bread you save until tomorrow will be a little drier. I hardly ever manage to hold off cutting it early for the sake of a better experience tomorrow!

Notice the lack of large voids – perfect for sandwiches

Alterations to the recipe

I sometimes replace 150-200 grams of the white bread flour with spelt or mixed seed flour. It does seem to drop the rise a little though. I have tried adding a little dried bakers yeast to balance this but with limited success.

I have replaced all 500 grams of white bread flour with brown bread flour. It was OK, but despite me generally preferring brown bread,  with sourdough it just does not seem right to me.

I really like adding a teaspoon of smoked, sweet paprika to the mix. This is partly why I put the salt etc in the jug I later user for the water, I put the extra flavour in the jug too and the water washes out any flavouring that has remained in the jug.

Chop up a handful of sundried tomatoes (drained of their oil on kitchen paper as the oil seems to inhibit the rise) and add those with a good squirt (say 25ml) of double strength tomato puree.

 

1) You could use sea salt or Pink Himalayan salt instead of dirt-cheap table salt –  but it’s all the same stuff really, it’s dried out sea and mostly consists of the specific salt compound sodium chloride. The stuff dug out the ground is from a few hundred million years ago and sea salt is usually from drying out current sea water. The problem with salt that is not table salt is it is probably not as fine so it might impede rise more.

 

Sourdough – Creating The “Starter” December 18, 2020

Posted by mwidlake in Baking, off-topic, Private Life.
Tags: ,
2 comments

Making and Baking A Sourdough Loaf –>>

A couple of people have asked me to describe how I create the Sourdough bread that I often tweet about baking. It’s too much for a Facebook post, and waaaay too much for a twitter thread, so I’m putting it here on my blog. This is part one – you need something called a “Sourdough Starter” to make sourdough bread, this is how I create my starter. Part two will describe making an actual loaf of sourdough.

Nothing much beats a sandwich made with home made sourdough

I know this is seriously off-topic for a blog that is supposed to mostly considers Oracle tech & performance, working in Oracle/I.T, and thoughts on IT management & how people work, but let’s face it – the more semi-retired I get the more this blog is becoming somewhere I simply share “stuff”. However, there is a bit of a link. Over the last few years baking bread has been taken up by a surprising number of people in the Oracle Presenting sphere (and this pre-dates the craze for making your own bread that came with Covid-19). One presenter, Jože Senegačnik, even wins national awards for his bread in Slovenia.

What is Sourdough?

Sourdough is a rustic type of bread, usually white, with a dark, thick crust and usually more flavour than a standard loaf of white bread. I know I am biased, but the sourdough bread I make is about the nicest bread I have ever eaten (with perhaps the exception of the bread of some of my other baking friends). It is certainly nicer than your average loaf and better than “normal” bread I have made at home.

Sourdough bread has an open texture (lots of holes), so it is quite light and, at the centre, soft. Sometimes the bread has large voids in it. If you buy sourdough in a shop or it is part of a meal in a café/restaurant (it’s almost always the bread used in posh cafes with your smashed avocado and free range egg for breakfast) it seems to me that the posher the place, the larger the voids. Sometimes a slice of sourdough toast can be more void than bread. It does not need the large voids and, in my opinion, they are detrimental to the bread. You can’t make a sandwich or put anything on the bread without the contents falling through the big holes! It’s fine with soup & stews I suppose, where you are dipping chunks in liquid.

Sourdough is a type of wheat-based bread where instead of using dried yeast or fresh yeast that comes in blocks that look like soft cheese, you use an active, growing “porridge” of yeast. This is a fairly thick mixture of strong bread flour and water, with the yeast growing in it, slowly consuming the flour to produce more yeast.

big voids to lose your topping through…

This “porridge” is called the Starter, and you add it to a mixture of more bread flour, water, and a little salt, to make your bread dough for baking. The starter smells quite strongly, distinctly sour, and I suspect (but am not sure) that sourdough bread is named more for the smell of the starter than the final loaf, which only has a hint of the smell if any at all.

The bread itself also has a distinctive tang to it, not as marked as the smell of the starter mixture, but it is a key part of the flavour.

The crust is an important part of a sourdough loaf. It tends to be thicker, stronger, and (when fresh), well… crustier than normal bread.

The key to it all is the starter, so how do you create and keep your starter?

 

 

The Jar

You need a sealable jar to hold your starter. I use a Kilner jar, as pictured, but a very large jam jar will probably be fine. The jar needs to be able to hold well over a pint/half litre. My jar can hold a litre, which is large enough to generate enough sourdough starter for a good sized loaf but not so large it won’t fit in my fridge (which is important).

Once you have your jar, make sure you have:

  • a packet of white strong bread flour.
  • either some grapes or apples or, if you can manage it, some starter from a friend.
  • at least a week before you want an actual loaf of your own sourdough bread.

I would recommend you use white bread flour as brown or wholemeal (or even seeded) not only provides bits in your mixture where yeast cells would struggle to get to (so might make it more likely for your starter to get infected and “go off”) but as you add quite a bit of starter to the final dough, it’s always going to be partially wholemeal or brown if that is what your starter is based on, no matter what you want.

It has to be strong bread flour. Strong bread flour has a higher percentage of protein, gluten, in it. This is vital to support the texture of bread. Cake is lighter than bread and normal flour that you make cakes out of has less gluten in it.

Sterilise your jar before you use it. Either wash it in really hot water or, preferably, but it in an oven at about 120C for 20, 30 minutes. Let it cool to room temperature before you use it though. You want to sterilise it as the idea is to get a yeast colony growing in the jar that will out-compete bacteria and not-yeast fungi and keep the mixture clean and edible and not poisonous. To begin with there will not be a lot of yeast cells and any bacteria or fungus present could make the mixture bad before the yeast takes hold.

Making the starter

This just needs a little more mixing

Put about 300 grams of the strong white bread flour in the jar and add about 300ml of water, stirring it. you might want to add the water in two or three parts, mixing it well as you go but don’t stir it for minutes. You will hopefully end up with a smooth mixture that is a bit thicker than porridge/wallpaper paste/pesto. Now add a little more water until it *is* the consistency of porridge. Thin enough that it would pour, thickly, but thick enough so that a spoon stuck in it will probably stay in place. Don’t forget to take the spoon out…

Now the tricky bit. Getting the yeast in it. Don’t use baker’s yeast or brewer’s yeast or anything you would buy to make a normal loaf of bread, you want something slower growing and, if possible, local. In some places, at least in the UK, you might have enough yeast in the air to get it going, especially if you live in the countryside near orchards. Leave the jar with the lid open for a few hours and then shut it. A more reliable way to get the yeast is to take the skin off four or five grapes, preferably ones you have had in the house a few days, or some peel (just a couple of long stripes) from an apple, either a locally grown one or one that’s been hanging about in the fruit bowl a few days (but is not rotten!!!). The peel from fruits like this are covered in many yeasts. Use only the peel, not the pulp of the fruit. Chop the peel into little bits and throw it in the mixture and stir.

The yeasts on the skin will get it all going

If you are lucky enough to know someone who already makes sourdough who is local (in which case, why are you reading this?!? Go have a cup of tea with them or a glass of wine and get them to show you how to do all this – relevant covid-19 restrictions allowing of course) then get some off them, about 30ml will be more than enough. I got some from a local bakery a couple of years back who specialised in sourdough. You can even use dried out sourdough, as I did once. I’ll put the little story of that in another post.

The advantage of using some existing starter mix is that it gets going quicker and you an be pretty sure it will work. Getting your starter fully active from scratch using peel or the air can take weeks, a dollop of starter in it’s prime will get you a fully active new starter in days. I swap the jar I keep my starter in every few months, as they can get a bit gungy & crusty, I make the bread/water porridge and chuck in about 200ml of my existing mixture – usually what is left when I am making a loaf. I can use the “new” starter created in this way in a couple of days.

Shut the jar. If you were lucky enough to use existing starter, keep it out at cool room temperature if you are making a loaf in a day or two. Otherwise put it in the fridge.

If you really are starting from fresh, with peel, put the jar somewhere that is “cool room temperature”, that is about 16-18C, not near a radiator or source of heat, not somewhere cold. Hopefully, in a few days you will see little bubbles in the mixture. That means the yeast is growing and releasing carbon dioxide! After about 5 days, whether you see little bubbles or not, take out about a third of the mixture and discard, replace with the same volume of flour/water mix that you removed, give it all a good stir and seal the jar again. Do so again in another 5 days. If you do not see any bubbles by now, it has probably failed. Discard and start again.

A starter in it’s prime, a day after being fed

If the mixture develops any colour other than pale cream/oatmeal (so if it goes green or purple or pink or grey) you now have a jar of poison. Bacteria or fungus have won and out-competed the yeast. If there are spots of grey or other colour on the surface, or fluffy spots, again it is poison. Throw the contents away, sterilise the jar, try again.

Once you have a pale cream/maybe very slightly oatmeal coloured gloop that bubbles a bit you have your starter. Well done. You now have a new pet in your life.

Looking After The Starter

Once you have created the starter you have actually created a living colony – and you have to feed and care for it. If the yeast runs out of food it will go dormant and that opens the door to bacteria or moulds getting a foothold and growing. You have to keep the yeast active and reproducing. To do this you feed it.

Professional bakers who are making a lot of sourdough bread are constantly taking out part of the starter mixture and using it in the dough. An 800 gram loaf will use between 150 and 250 grams of starter depending on how they make the dough. This is replaced with the same volume of flour/water mixture they take out. You can do this yourself, if you are going to make a new loaf every few days you can keep the starter at room temperature and replace what you take out with flour/water mix. The yeast in the remaining starter quickly works through the added mix and new yeast cells grow.

If you are going to make a loaf once a week you can extend this process by putting the starter in the fridge. You take the starter out the fridge a day before you are going to use it. This is so it warms up and becomes more active. If you have space in the jar, you might want to add a bit of extra flour/water mix for the yeast’s breakfast (about 100 grams flour) when you take it out the fridge – I do. You take out about a third of the starter when you make the loaf the next day and replace it with flour/water mix. I leave my jar out for a few hours/overnight after this to let it get going and then you put it back in the fridge.

If you keep your starter for more than a week in the fridge, or 3 or 4 days at room temperature, without using it, you have to feed it. Take out a third of the mixture and discard, replace with water/flour mix that you stir into the starter. So long as you regularly feed the starter it will last pretty much forever, but of course you are simply throwing away flour all the time.

If you are a bad starter owner and you forget about it, it won’t be happy. A layer of fluid will separate out at the top of the mixture and it will go grey. Grey is bad. If this happens, if the fluid and only the very surface of the starter are a light grey, no fluff, you can pour off the fluid and the top third of the starter, feed it, and it might be OK. I’ve brought back starters from grey gloom a few times. However, the starter won’t make a good loaf again until you have fed it a couple of times. If the grey comes back straight away, you best put the poor thing down.

If your starter or anything in the jar goes pink, orange, purple, green, or fluffy, you have let the yeast get too weak and you have grown something new. It might be useful to a microbiologist, it could even contain a new antibiotic unknown to man, but it is far, far more likely to be poison. Throw it away, start again.

When you feed the starter, make sure there is space for it to expand. I keep my jar about half full. When I feed it, the contents expand with the CO2 and then subside. If the jar is too full, there is no space to expand. Also, I suspect my jar leaks every so slightly so no pressure builds up. If your jar is totally sealed you might have issues with it spraying out when you open it. Let me know if you do, photographs of the mess would be appreciated.

The more regularly you use the starter, the better will be the bread you make. When I’ve kept my starter out of the fridge for a week or two and either made a loaf or simply fed the starter every 3 or 4 days, it gets more active and the dough rises more readily when I make a loaf. If I leave the mixture in the fridge for a month, only occasionally feeding it, the first loaf I make from it struggles to rise.

Starters Vary

I’ve occasionally had two starters running at the same time. I once had my home-grown starter and also one seeded from some starter given to me by Jože. I’ve also had a starter that was initiated from a sample from a local baker’s, as I have said, and I’ve created a new starter from scratch when I already had one going. The bread made from different starters have slightly different tastes. And the one I got from Jože was more active than my home grown one. I have to say, I did not notice much difference between the two home grown starters I had. I am sure this is down to a difference in the actual yeasts in the mixture (or not, in the case of my two home-grown ones).

Hmmmmm…. Tasty

I discussed this with a fellow Oracle Presenter Baker and we decided it was highly likely that the actual yeasts in there not only vary with where the seed material came from but also how you keep it. If you keep it in the fridge, yeasts that are more tolerant of cold conditions will survive better, keep the starter at room temperature and those yeasts that reproduce faster in warmer conditions will take over.

Whatever, a loaf of sourdough bread you make from your own starter is a real treat. I’ll describe my baking process in the next post.