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Friday Philosophy – Who Comes Looking? September 18, 2009

Posted by mwidlake in Blogging.
Tags: ,
8 comments

I’ve been running this blog for a few months now and I find it interesting to see how people come to it. A handful of people come to it as I tell them I have a blog page, but most people come across it by either:

  • Links from other blogs or web pages.
  • Search engines.

WordPress gives me stats on these for Today and Yesterday and I can check back on the referrers and searches for any given day, going back several months. Most blog sites provide the same features, I thought I would just run through them for those who do not have a blog.

I can tell when I have been mentioned on someone else’s blog, as I usually see a spike in my hits and their web page is at or near the top of the list of referrers. Interestingly, I will sometimes see a burst of hits from an old reference on someone else’s blog or webpage. I think this happens when a third person has referenced the page or person which then referenced me.

Another interesting facet is the impact on my hits if an Oracle Name mentions me. My busiest day occurred when Richard Foote mentioned a posting I did on “Unhelpful Helpful People” and a couple of other well-known Oracle Names also picked up on the thread. It’s a bit like a small-time-actor getting into a scene with a Hollywood Star🙂.

The most interesting, though, are the search engine hits.

My favorite search term to lead to my blog so far is “martin widlake unhelpful people”. I really hope that was someone looking for the post I mention above, as opposed to anything else…

As time goes by, the search engine hits are generating a larger and larger slice of my traffic (and the personal mentions less and less🙂 ). This is going to be partly due to me putting more content on the Blog to be found but also, as I get more hits and links, search engines will give me more prominence. It becomes self-feeding. Search engines find me as I have been visited before, so I get visited again and Search engines see that I have been visited even more and move me up the list…

{This is, of course, how Burleson gets so much traffic, he always references back to himself and his web sites and appears to have several sites that all cross-reference between them, priming the search engine pump (or absolutely flooding it, I suspect)}.

Some of the most common searches that find me are on obscure items I have blogged about. They may not be of such general interest {such as when I blogged about errors with gathering system statistics {{and more to follow on that topic}} } but I guess when someone hits the same issue or topic, I am one of a very few places that has mentioned it. I get a steady trickle of hits for “c_obj#_intcol#” since I blogged about it often being the biggest object in the SYSTEM tablespace. So perhaps to increase my search engine hits I should not blog about mainstream issues but rather really obscure, odd stuff than almost no one is interested in!

Some days I will get several hits by people searching on “Martin Widlake”. I wonder why they are searching on me specifically. Occasionally, it has been just before I am called about a job. Usually not though {so maybe it was about a job – but then they found my blog and decided against it…}.

Some searches that get to my blog are just odd. Yesterday one search that found me was “how to put fingers on keyboard”. Why? I have no idea why a search on that would land on my blog. Maybe I should try it!

Oh, and I suddenly have a favorite search that found me, hot in today, just as I am blogging about the very topic:

“it’s a crock of cr4p and it stinks”

Now what is that about? Why search on it and why find me?

*sigh*

Spending Time in London August 4, 2009

Posted by mwidlake in Blogging, Perceptions.
3 comments

I’m currently working in London, to the west of the centre but within coverage of the underground system. As a result, getting to and from home and work takes a looong time. This gives me a little time to do stuff on my netbook on the train, but if it is really busy and when I am on the tube it is not possible to do this. It’s wasted time.

To keep as much of my sanity intact as I can and reduce the amount of time I spend doing nothing but wondering why all other commuters appear so unfriendly {I know, most of them are thinking exactly the same :-)}, I opt to stay in London a couple of nights a week. The benefit of this is that either I have nothing to do in the evening and I can read manuals and do this blog {or alternatively watch rubbish on TV or read a book}. Or I can go and drink beer with people I know. I don’t know that many people in London, I have to confess, but I have had a couple of very enjoyable evenings so far.

Tonight was with Doug Burns. I don’t know Doug that well, but have enjoyed talking to him at UKOUG meetings and exchanging emails/comments on blogs. It was excellent to spend a couple of hours and maybe one too many beers with Doug and talk about what can only be described as an eclectic range of topics. I also managed to mug him for his excellent presentation on AWR for the next MI SIG meeting in October. I hope that last beer was not too much and he remembers…

This is part of the whole Oracle Community thing. It’s good to Blog, it’s good to go on forums and it is good to exchange emails, but you can’t beat meeting in person, either at conference, at user group meetings or just because you are in the same town that evening. I find once you have met, communicating is a lot easier {I had an excellent night in Newcastle with Piet de Visser about 18 months ago and now we exchange rants and thoughts quite often}. So, if anyone out there is in London and fancies a beer, you could drop me a line. I’ll buy the first one if you ask nicely.

Right, where was that manual on oracle wait interface…Oh, “Celebrity animals have got talent on ice” has come on the TV, maybe I’ll watch that.

How Much Knowledge is Enough? June 13, 2009

Posted by mwidlake in Blogging, Perceptions, performance.
Tags: , ,
8 comments

I’ve had a bee in my bonnet for a good few years now, which is this:

How do you learn enough about something new to be useful when you are working 40, 50, 60 hours a week?

Another bee is how much do you actually need to know to become useful? The bee following that one is if you do not have enough time to investigate something, how do you find the answer? Buzzing up behind is to fully understand how something works, you often need a staggering amount of back knowledge – how do you get it? Oh dear, it’s a hive in my head, not a single bee.

I am of course in this blog mostly thinking about Oracle and in particular Oracle performance. I think that these days it must be really very hard to get going with performance tuning as it has become such a broad topic. I don’t know if you have noticed but nearly all the performance experts are not in their teens. Or twenties. And precious few in their thirties. Forties are pretty much the norm.  We {and please excuse my audacity in putting myself in such an august group}  have been doing Oracle and performance for many years and have stacked up knowledge and understanding to help us.

For me this issue was thrown into sharp relief about 4 or 5 years ago. I had become a manager and, although I was learning lots of other skills and things, when it came to Oracle Technology I think I was forgetting more than I was learning. Oh, I was learning some new Oracle stuff but it was at a more infrastructure level. The real kick of reality was going to presentations on performance and Oracle internals. At the end of the 90’s I would go along and learn one or two new things but knew 90% of what was said. By the mid 2000’s I would go along and know 50% , the other 50% would be new. Then I went to one talk and found I was scribbling away as I knew precious little of what was being presented. More worryingly, I was struggling with “How does this fit in with what I already know?”.  I just didn’t know enough of the modern stuff.

That was a pivotal moment for me. It had the immediate effect of making me start reading blogs and books and manuals again. It’s not easy to find the time but I soon noticed the benefit. Even if I learnt only a little more one evening a week, I would invariably find that knowledge helping me the very next week or month. I was back on the road to being an expert. {Or so I thought}. Oh, it had a long term effect too. I changed job and went back to the technical, but that is for another day.

But hang on, during my decline I had not stopped being useful. I was still the Oracle performance expert where I worked and could still solve most of the performance issues I came across. It made me realise you do not need to know everything to be useful and you could solve a lot of problems without knowing every little detail of how something works. A good general knowledge of the Oracle environment and a logical approach to problem solving goes a long way.

I actually started to get annoyed by the “attitude” of experts who would bang on and on and on about how you should test everything and prove to yourself that your fix to a problem had fixed itas otherwise it was just being hopeful. I thought to myself “That is fine for you, oh exalted expert, as you have time for all this and don’t have 60 hours of day job to do every week. Give us a break and get real. Most of us have to get the problem solved, move on and get by with imperfect knowledge. Doing all that testing and proving, although nice in a perfect world, is not going to happen”.

Yep, I had an attitude problem🙂. I was getting angry at what I now think is just a difference in perception. I’ll come back to that in a moment.

I don’t think I am going to go back on my opinion that for most people in a normal job, there simply is not time to do all the testing and proving and you have to move on, Making do with received knowledge. It just is not an ideal world. However, we need the experts to uncover that knowledge and we need experts who are willing to communicate that knowledge and we need experts we can rely on. I am very, very grateful to the experts I have learned from.  

All the time on blogs, forums and conversations the issue of “how do we know what sources we can trust” regularly comes up. Well, unfortunately I think that if you do not have time to do the testing and learning needed to become an expert yourself, you have to simple chose your experts, accept what they say but remain slightly skeptical about what they say. Everyone makes mistakes after all. I would advise you only accept someone as an expert and rely on their advice if they are willing to demonstrate why they believe what they believe. Everything else is just an unsubstantiated opinion. 

But I’ve come to some conclusions about most of the above questions I started with.

  1. If you are judicious in choosing your sources, you can learn more reliably and easily.
  2. Even a little bit of more knowledge helps and it often comes into use very quickly.
  3. The hard part? You have to make that time to learn, sorry.
  4. Although testing and proving is good, life is not perfect. If you did (1) you might get away without it. But don’t blame the expert if you get caught out.

But I’ve not addressed the point about needing all that back knowledge to fully understand how something works. Well, I think there is no short cut on that one. If you want to be an expert you need that background. And you need to be sure about that background. And that is where it all has fallen apart for me. I started a blog!

I already knew you learn a lot by teaching others, I’ve been running training courses on and off for a few years. But in writing a blog that is open to the whole community, I’ve realised I know less than I thought. A lot less. And if I want to be a source of knowledge, an expert, I have to fill a lot of those gaps. So I am going to have to read a lot, test things, makes sure that when I believe I know something I’ve checked into it and, when I fix something, I know why it is fixed {as best I can, that is} . All those things experts tell us we need to do. And that brings me back to my perception issue. 

Those who I think of as the best in this field all pretty much give the advice to test and prove. And they have to do this themselves all the time, to make sure what they say is right. And they are the best as what they say is nearly always right. It seems to be excellent advice.

However, I think it is only good advice, as it is advice you can’t always take, because there is too much else to do. I think sometimes experts forget that many people are just too pressured at work to do their own testing, not because they don’t want to test but because you can only live so long without sleeping. 

Anyway, I said something foolish about becoming an expert. I better go and check out some other blogs… start reading some manuals… try out a few ideas on my test database.  I’ll get back to you on how I’m progressing on that one in about, say, a year or two? All those gaps to fill….

Blogtastic June 7, 2009

Posted by mwidlake in Blogging.
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2 comments

I wonder how many blog entries world-wide have the title “blogtastic” or “blogging about blogs” or something similar.

I’ve been blogging properly for about 3 weeks now. Why did I start? 3 main reasons.

  • I forget stuff {I’m getting to that age} so I thought a blog was as good a place as any to stick stuff where I could find it.
  • I like to teach.  I know, it sounds a bit naff, but I honestly like explaining things and teching people stuff. If I was starting out on my career again, I would do more training.
  • Narcisism. There has to be an element of wanting to be noticed in anyone who blogs! I’d like to be a “C” list Oracle Name🙂

After a few weeks blogging, what have I learned?

  • I really like it when I get comments. It is less like talking to an empty room.
  • I am talking to an empty room! When I linked back to my blog from Jonathan Lewis’s blog my hits jumped from a half dozen to 80. They are heading back to a half dozen now.
  • Google does not pick up stuff just because it is on a blog. Which is maybe good as think how many spurious hits you would get for 99% of stuff and it is bad as, not only are people missing out on the great stuff I say, more worryinlgy, when I ask Google about some aspect of Oracle I know nothing about, how much great stuff am I missing?
  • It takes a lot of time to do rigorous explanations of oracle facts, which is what I have always demanded from my Oracle sources (and is why I use “-burleson” in my google searches).

I know my blogs are too long, I’ve been told. But then, they are supposed to be for my own benefit and I like to see why I decided what I think I know.

It takes a loooong time to say what you want to say. I’ve put a few basic techie things up and have not touched on my 2 other areas, VLDB and management. It is going to take me a long time to put down things I want to put down. I have a list of , ohhh, maybe 50 things to blog about already.

And last for now? It’s addictive. I want to put down everything now.I want people to find and read my blog now. I want my stats to be high.Why? Narcisism of course🙂 But also because if I’m going to teach people there has to be people listening.

And really for last. Why do I want to teach? Well, the post on Consistent Gets says it all. When you teach people, you learn. The hardest questions often come from people who know the least about a topic.

More testing code layout May 19, 2009

Posted by mwidlake in Blogging.
Tags:
2 comments

Well, I pinged an email to the nice support guys at WordPress.com about whether I had missed something about turning off the gutter (line numbering) from the sourcode view, but there is no flag I missed and no mention was made of it coming in the future. I also am a little concerned that using sourcecode slows down the rendering of the web page. So I might save it for special code.

I also found out that if your code sample is more than about 60 characters long, you exceed the width of the text area and get scroll bars to the bottom and side (not of course helped by not being able to suppres the line numbering):

select count(*) "Invalid count:" from dba_objects where status != 'VALID';
select substr(owner,1,14) ownr
,substr(object_name||' - '|| object_type,1,36) obj_name
,to_char(created,'DD-MON-YY') CREATED
,to_char(last_ddl_time,'ddmmyy hh24:mi') last_ddl
from dba_objects where status !='VALID'
order by 1,2
/

compared to:

select count(*) "Invalid count:"
from dba_objects where status != 'VALID';
select substr(owner,1,14) ownr
,substr(object_name||' - '|| object_type,1,36) obj_name
,to_char(created,'DD-MON-YY') CREATED
,to_char(last_ddl_time,'ddmmyy hh24:mi') last_ddl
from dba_objects where status !='VALID'
order by 1,2
/

But the nice support desk person did suggest I try pre tags;

select count(*) "Invalid count:"
from dba_objects where status != 'VALID';
select substr(owner,1,14) ownr
,substr(object_name||' - '|| object_type,1,36) obj_name
,to_char(created,'DD-MON-YY') CREATED
,to_char(last_ddl_time,'ddmmyy hh24:mi') last_ddl
from dba_objects where status !='VALID'
order by 1,2
/

Hmmm, nope, not really better than code.
I am starting to think I duffed slightly in chosing this style, Regulus. I suspect it does not respond to many formatting tags.

On the plus side, the nice helpdesk person did agree to putting the issue of access to the flags for sourcecode on the list of requested enhancements. Nice people.

Testing code layout May 18, 2009

Posted by mwidlake in Blogging.
Tags:
4 comments

Well, as a new blogger, I am having the usual issues everyone does – with layout. Specifically, code. Code takes up space and it looks best if it is in a fixed font. I can’t see an option to set the font for specific parts of the text, so I need to use tags I guess. So let us try.

Piet de Visser gave me a couple of hints

First, I shall use the code tag

 test102>select a.result-b.result
  2  from (select max(pers_id)+1 result,1 eric from person) a
  3  ,(select min(pers_id) result,1 eric from person) b
  4  where a.eric=b.eric
  5  /

Hmm, it looks fine in the box I enter my text in, a nice small courier font. But now you are looking at it on the published page, it is in larger text and in a shaded box. The shaded box is nice, the large text is a pain. Code tend to be long, based on 80 characters per line or more.

Let’s try sourcode with language=’sql’ (sourcecode uses square brackets not angle brackets)

  test102>select a.result-b.result
  2  from (select max(pers_id)+1 result,1 eric from person) a
  3  ,(select min(pers_id) result,1 eric from person) b
  4  where a.eric=b.eric
  5  /

Now, that is more like it but the addition of the line numbers is a duplication, I will have to edit all my sql*plus output to get rid of it. Can I just have the layout with the code structure highlighting?…

  test102>select a.result-b.result
  2  from (select max(pers_id)+1 result,1 eric from person) a
  3  ,(select min(pers_id) result,1 eric from person) b
  4  where a.eric=b.eric
  5  /

Whoops, it demands a language, so that it can parse out and highlight the syntax. At least you can see the kind of syntax used though. Check out This note by wordpress on what they suggest. This link here says something about the underlying javascript but I guess wordpress have wrapped this feature as they don’t support javascript (as otherwise some swine would abuse it to damage the site). A shame as I would like to turn off the line numbering. Hmmm, I tried a few things like the below but no luck:

test102>select a.result-b.result
2 from (select max(pers_id)+1 result,1 eric from person) a
3 ,(select min(pers_id) result,1 eric from person) b
4 where a.eric=b.eric
5 /

I’ll see if using the direct syntax works, I expect not…

<pre name=”code” class=”sql”
test102>select a.result-b.result
2 from (select max(pers_id)+1 result,1 eric from person) a
3 ,(select min(pers_id) result,1 eric from person) b
4 where a.eric=b.eric
5 /</code>

No.

So, if I edit my text a little and use the sourcecode language=’sql’ tag…

select a.result-b.result
from (select max(pers_id)+1 result,1 eric from person) a
     ,(select min(pers_id) result,1 eric from person) b
where a.eric=b.eric
/

Well, it is OK but it does not show it in fixed font in the post but you can click on the option to do so. It is a shame that it is not possible to set the simple (what looks like courier) text to be used in the formatted box via a flag or something.

I could pay for the CSS feature, that would probably make all of this easier.

What can I achieve with changing font size? I Looked here for some instructions.
In the below I try and use font size=n tags…

eric eric eric
eric eric eric
eric eric eric

but it does not work.
How about span? font is, after all, depricated…

eric eric eric

No. No luck. Span is not working for me either. Maybe it is my theme that does not allow it.

OK, enough on that and back to the day job. I now know I can improve the layout but I’d like to be able to do more… I guess I could sell the cat to science and buy the upgrade?🙂