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My first book is now physically in my hands. August 22, 2016

Posted by mwidlake in Instrumentation, PL/SQL, publications, SQL, writing.
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4 comments
Proud "parent" of a bouncing baby book

Proud “parent” of a bouncing baby book

Today a box arrived from Oracle Press. In it were a few copies of “Real-World SQL and PL/SQL” which I co-authored with Arup Nanda, Brendan Tierney, Heli Helskyaho and Alex Nuitjen. I know I only blogged about the book a couple of weeks back, how I became involved and the impact it had on my life for several months. But as I can now physically handle and read the final article, I could not resist putting up a quick post on it. Honestly, I’ll stop being a book bore soon.

My contribution to the book was three chapters in the section “Essential Everyday Advanced PL/SQL”. The idea was to covers some core, standard ways of using PL/SQL which are often overlooked or implemented without considering the impact they can have. There are a few things I cover that are often talked about, generally regarded as a good thing to do – but so often are not done! So just to quickly summarise my chapters:

Chapter 6 is about running PL/SQL from SQL, ie calling both built-in and user defined functions from SQL. It’s a great way to compartmentalise your business logic and extend the capabilities of Oracle’s SQL implementation in an easy and seamless manner. Only people are often unaware of the potential performance and read consistency impact it can have, or how Oracle 11g and 12c help reduce these issues.

Chapter 7, “Instrumenting and Profiling PL/SQL”, covers something that I feel is a major oversight in many PL/SQL development projects. Instrumenting your code, any code (not just PL/SQL), is vital to producing an application that is professional and will continue to work correctly for many, many years. However, it’s a bit like washing your hands after going to the loo – we all know it is the correct thing to do but so many people just don’t! Without instrumentation it is almost impossible to see how your code is performing, where time is spent and where problems are when they occur. I’m sick of having to guess where the problem is when people report slow performance when some basic and light-weight instrumentation will tell you exactly where the problem is. And as for profiling PL/SQL, it’s one of the rarest things to be done but it is so helpful.

It physically exists

It physically exists

Chapter 9 is on using PL/SQL for Automation and Administration. Like many people, I have automated many tasks with a PL/SQL harness – backups, partitions maintenance, metric gathering, data life-cycle management, regular data loads. You end up writing the same sort of process over and over again and usually there are several versions of such controlling frameworks across a company, written by different people (and sometimes the same people!). A large part of this chapter takes the code for creating the examples from chapter 6 and the instrumentation from chapter 7 and builds up a simple but comprehensive framework which can be used to control almost any data load or administrative task you need to do with an Oracle database. The key thing is it can be used for many, many processes so you need only the one framework. So you don’t have to keep writing them as it’s boring to keep writing them. And because the framework demonstrated includes instrumentation, the framework you implement will be easy to monitor and debug in years to come. I have to confess, I kind of wrote that chapter “just for me”. It is my standard automation framework that I now always use, so I can concentrate on the actual task being done and not the nuts-and-bolts of controlling it, and I’ve wanted to properly document it for years.

Something all the authors agreed on is that whilst most technical books describe how elements of a language or feature work, they do not really talk about the “how and why” you do things. The stuff you learn by using the language for a long time and doing a good deal of things wrong. In this book we attempt to put in some of that “how and why”. In my chapters there are a few anecdotes about when things have gone wrong and, as a result, you learn some of the “how not”🙂

I’m at a lot of conferences over the next few months, including OOW16, DOAG16 and UKOUG Tech16. If you get a copy of the book and want it signed, you’ll find me very happy to do so. Many of my co-authors are at these events too, so you could get us all to scribble all over the book. NB this will not work for electronic versions🙂

BTW do you like the t-shirt?

Want to Know More about Oracle’s Core? October 19, 2011

Posted by mwidlake in performance, Private Life, publications.
Tags: , , ,
14 comments

I had a real treat this summer during my “time off” in that I got to review Jonathan Lewis’s up-coming new book. I think it’s going to be a great book. If you want to know how Oracle actually holds it’s data in memory, how it finds records already in the cache and how it manages to control everything so that all that committing and read consistency really works, it will be the book for you.

{Update, Jonathan has confirmed that, unexpected hiccups aside, Oracle Core: Essential Internals for DBAs and Developers should be available from October 24, 2011}

{Thanks to Mike Cox, who let me know it is already available to be reserved at Amazon}

Jonathan got in touch with me around mid-May to say he was working on the draft of his new book, one that would cover “how does Oracle work”, the core mechanics. Would I be willing to be one of his reviewers? Before anyone comments that there is not likely to be much about core Oracle that I know and Jonathan does not, he did point out that he had already lined up someone to be his technical reviewer, ie someone he expected to know as much as he and help spot actual errors. The technical reviewer is the most excellent Tanel Poder, who posted a little mention of it a couple of months back.

I was to act more like a typical reader – someone who knew the basics and wanted to learn more. I would be more likely to spot things he had assumed we all know but don’t, or bits that did not clearly explain the point if you did not already know the answer. ie an incomplete geek. I figured I could manage that🙂.

It was a lot harder work than I expected and I have to confess I struggled to supply back feedback as quickly as Jonathan wanted it – I was not working but I was very busy {and he maybe did not poke me with a sharp stick for feedback soon enough}. As anybody who has had to review code specifications or design documents will probably appreciate, you don’t just read stuff when you review it, you try and consider if all the information is there, can it be misunderstood and, if you find that you don’t understand a section, you need to work out if the fault is with you, with the way it is written or with what is written. When I read a technical {or scientific} document and I do not fully understand it, I usually leave it a day, re-read it and if it still seems opaque, I just move on. In this case I could not do that, I had to ensure I understood it or else tell Jonathan why I thought I did not understand it. If there are sections in the end book that people find confusing, I’ll feel I let Jonathan down.

Just as tricky, on the one hand, as I’ve been using Oracle for so long and I do know quite a lot about Oracle {although clearly not enough in the eyes of the author🙂 } I had to try and “not know” stuff to be able to decide if something was missing. On the other, when I wanted to know more about something was I just being a bit too nerdy? I swung more towards the opinion that if I wanted to know more, others would too.

I have to say that I really enjoyed the experience and I learnt a lot. I think it might change how I read technical books a little. I would run through each chapter once to get the feel of it all and then re-read it properly, constantly checking things in both version 11 and 10 of Oracle as I read the drafts and would not let myself skip over anything until I felt I really understood it. As an example, I’ve never dug into internal locks, latches and mutexes much before and now that I’ve had to learn more to review the book, I have a much better appreciation of some issues I’ve seen in the wild.

Keep an eye out for the book, it should be available by the end of this year and be called something like “Oracle Core” {I’ll check with Jonathan and update this}. I won’t say it will be an easy read – though hopefully a little easier as a result of my input – as understanding things always takes some skull work. But it will certainly be a rewarding read and packed full of information and knowledge.

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