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OOW Report – No List of Talks, No Cloud, Just Thoughts on Community October 30, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in conference, Perceptions, User Groups.
Tags: , ,

As I type I am in my hotel, sipping a final beer (it was a gift that has been to a few talks with me in my backpack) and looking back at Oracle Open World 2015. I must confess I am a little drunk so we will see if this post lasts…
{Update – it passed the next-morning-sobriety test. I was only a little drunk}

OOW15 beers

I am on record as saying I don’t like Open World. I came to previous events in 2003 and 2004 I think (yes, over a decade back), both times at short notice on the behest of the Mother Corporation. And at those times I only knew people at the event from Corporation Oracle – not people in the Oracle User Community. It is miserable being 1 of xx thousand people who you *should* share interests with but simply don’t know. Oracle employees are generally excluded from the event so that removed nearly all of my contacts. It is such a large event that if you meet someone on Sunday and chatted to them – you may well never see them again! After all, it is 1 in x thousand people even for your specific area of interest. I’m not good at chatting to people “cold” and the whole “entering the US” is such a bloody awful experience (Immigration just shout at you and growl and are, frankly, as welcoming as a Rottweiler at a kitten party) that the total experience from beginning to end was just, well, less pleasant than a bad week in the office.

This time was very, very different (though not the growling Rottweiler bit, sadly). Because I am now an active member of a couple of oracle “clubs” (Oracle ACE and OakTable) I knew more people. Because I blog and tweet I knew a lot of USA {and other} people, if only via social media. As a result of going to a good few different user groups (and often presenting) I have become friends with people from several communities. And I have also got better at “Cold chatting”. So for several days I have been meeting people like Danny Bryant (still my hero as he got my conference pass back to me after I dropped it on a bus!), Bobby Curtis, That Jeff Smith, Sarah CraynonZumbrum, Zahid Anwar… and about 37 other people I had never met or only met once. I have re-connected with a couple of dozen old friends too and hung around with closer friends from the UK & Europe. And it has been great. This is one of the great aspects of being an active member of the Oracle Community, there is a pool of people I can now talk to and relax with.

I’ve loved my OOW15 experience and that is fundamentally because I felt I was inside rather than outside. At this point I was planning to say that not everyone you meet in the flesh will turn out to be people you actually get on with – but I can honestly say that everyone I have met this week has been at least polite to me, most have been welcoming. I’m not saying all will be life-long friends and I am at long last wise enough to recognise that someone being polite to me does not mean they did not find me annoying. But one of the great things about a user group community is that almost everyone in it is actually on the “friendly” side of normal. If you are not, user groups are not going to be your thing!

It makes a huge difference. Being able to find someone (and modern social media makes that so much easier than a decade back when I hated this experience) to have a coffee with and a nice conversation can make a potentially lonely gap between presentations into an enjoyable afternoon. I missed half a dozen presentations this week as the conversations went on much longer and were more illuminating than you planned. I could just position myself at a central location and pretty soon a friend would wander by. Or, at least, someone who would not run away :-)

Being mindful of the above, if anyone came up to me to talk, I talked to them. There is a phrase that seems current in the US of “paying it forward” which means if you have had a nice experience, try to make someone else’s experience nice. Or is it “paying it backward”? I don’t know for sure but I like both. If you have been helped, help someone. If you think people should help each other, start it by being helpful first. I was able to do this a little bit myself by making sure I was around if a friend called Stew needed some company, as he is not as tied into the user community as others as he is new to this. However, I don’t think this will last as he is making such a name for himself that next year he’ll be introducing me to people! In turn, another friend, Brendan, made time to make sure I had company as he knew I’d not liked my prior experiences.

So all in all I now don’t dislike OOW. I like OOW. And the reason is the user community is there for me. It’s there for everyone who wishes to be a part of it. You won’t like everyone, everyone won’t like you – but that is fine, we all have our different characters – but you will gel with a good few people.

Note I have not mentioned presentation slots. Some were good, some were bad, a small number were great and a similar number were awful. But I did learn a lot and I appreciate the fact. I will say no more as, frankly, if you were not at the conference then a discussion of the presentations is pretty pointless!

I just want to end on a final consideration. I know I am now a member of a couple of “clubs” and that helps me in knowing people. But a lot of people I now know are not members of either of those clubs and I know them due to my simply being social-media active, a user group attender and I make myself cold-chat more. It almost hurts me to say it, but social media can be a good thing. Nothing beats face-to-face socialising, but knowing people virtually first is a great help in getting started with meeting them for real.

I really love the user group community. Or is that just the beer talking (which I finished over an hour back!)

{update – OK, it was the beer, I don’t love any of you. But I like you a lot…}

Friday Philosophy – 3 months, 3 conferences October 16, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in ACED, conference, Friday Philosophy, Presenting, Tech15.
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Flights are booked, hotels reserved, plans made. Don’t ask about talks prepared, just don’t :-)

This is not the usual list of “I’m going to this talk and I’m seeing that speaker” blog that people write before an event – well it is a little – it’s more about the different flavors of conference we have available to us.

I have an Oracle conference a month until the end of the year and I’m really looking forward to all of them. Each is very different. I know I am lucky to be able to do this sort of thing, that is go to so many conferences, and partly it is because of being an ACED. But fundamentally it’s come about as a result of the decision I made back in 2003 to give something back to the community that I’d learnt so much from, and even more so when a couple of years back my wife gave me permission to do less stuff that pays and more stuff that I enjoy. Oracle Community stuff.

First up of course is Oracle Open World 15. This includes a couple of days before hand with the ACED briefings. We get a heads-up on what is happening with the direction of Oracle Tech and Oracle expect us to feed back what we think. After 25 years in the business and dozens of conferences, this will be a first for me so I will be a newbie again (hmm, maybe not so new thinking about it, I’ve been on Customer Advisory Boards and Beta tested in the past so it will be interesting to see the difference). I’ve said in the past how I was not so fond of my prior Oracle Open World experiences. Too big and too razzmatazz for my repressed British personality. But the huge difference between this time and 10 years ago is not my being ACED, it is being a member of the community and looking forward to seeing so many people, catching up and talking about all things tech.
Elton John is apparently doing the appreciation event. I’m hoping for “Yellow Brick Road” era stuff and none of that modern post Y2K stuff…
Oh, and don’t forget, there is also the Oaktable presence at OOW, OakTable World. It’s free to all at OOW15 and if you want technical meat on your presentation bones, that is where you will find it.

In November, Friday 20th to Sunday 22nd, it is a totally different experience, the Bulgarian Oracle User Group Autumn conference. This is purely a tech conference, no dancing girls, no laser-show keynotes and not a hint of Elton John. Just a shed load of top presenters (so many ACE badges next to names) with a good showing of local talent too. Several of the speakers are coming to it from DOAG, a conference I was seriously considering putting papers forward for but decided not to, as I felt I was too busy at the end of the year – and then I got sweet-talked into putting forward abstracts for Bulgaria. Next year I’ll try for DOAG. This will be my first time at a BGOUG conference but I know from my friends that it is like many of the smaller European conferences. It has a more inclusive, friendly feel as you see the same people over and over again for the couple of days and spend time getting to know people pretty well and often having longer, more involved discussions about whatever tech you are working with. I’ve been really well looked after by the organisers already, helping me sort things out and advising me on what to do outside the event.

I’m combining this one with a short holiday with my wife. (She speaks Bulgarian so she will be very helpful in ordering beer in local bars). One down side to going to more conferences is that, as she travels a lot herself for work, some months we don’t see a lot of each other. It will be really nice to wander around Sofia together for a few days. The ironic thing is that her employer, actually her department, is doing some work out there that week – and they did not schedule in the only person in the team who speaks the language!

Finally there is “my” conference. Mine as in I feel it is my home conference, being in the UK and one I have presented at or helped organise for 12 years now. The UKOUG Tech15 conference. This is from Monday 7th December to Wednesday the 9th, and if you get registered in time you can also be at Super Sunday on the 6th (half a day focused on deeper tech talks). Again, a conference that puts technical content at the top and the sales sides comes along for the ride. It is a very large conference, vying with DOAG to be the biggest after Oracle Open World. We are less show and more tell than OOW but it lacks the personal feel of smaller conferences. We are back in Birmingham for this one and I have to say it’s all looking set for a great event. Registrations are significantly up on the last couple of years at this stage, the exhibition is selling well and we have great content lined up. I need to tweet more about Tech15, both about how such an event is organised (I know some of you liked hearing about that) but also about some of the things that will be happening. I’m quietly excited about a couple of things. The only problem is that, by the time I get to the actual Tech15 conference I am usually a bit spaced out and knackered from all the prep work and by the end of Wednesday (the last day) I’m physically drained – but with a head full of new information.

As I said, all three conferences have a different vibe and which one you prefer is down to what you want from your conference.

After all that I’ll be done with conferences. I refuse to go to any more until the following year…

Which reminds me, I better start putting in some abstracts and seeing if I’ve got stuff people want in their conferences next Spring.

What To Do at OOW15 (Social & Serious)? September 30, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in Meeting notes, Presenting, User Groups.
Tags: , ,

I’m going to OOW15 this year, my first Oracle Open World in 11 years I think. And despite the Prom Queen rejecting all my offerings, I will actually be sneaking in a presentation – which I am very happy about.

The European Oracle User Group (EOUG) get a few slots and two are being used on Sunday 25th, 13:30 – 15:15 for “More Than Another 12 on Oracle Database 12c” – 12 European experts all doing six minutes each on a couple of tid-bits on 12C, including Christian Antognini, Bjoern Rost, Brendan Tierney, Julain Dontcheff, Jonathan Lewis… plus Tim Hall and Maria Colgan if we can squeeze them in (thus “more then 12…”). It was a great success last year, so if you are going to OOW15 sign up to the session at this link to avoid disappointment. You can see more details by our organiser, Debra Lilley (thanks Debra), in her blog post about it.

So I know what I am doing for 6 minutes. What do I do for the rest of the time?

A main aim I’ll have is to try and meet up with loads of people I either only know via antisocial media or have not seen in years.

I am sure things have changed in over a decade and, I have to confess, I did not make the most of my last OOW experience. It was all rushed, I was pulled out there very last-minute (as part of being named Oracle Beta Tester of the Year by Oracle Magazine – get me :-) ) and they wanted me to be able to do some press stuff (it sounds grand – but there was not a lot of interest in me as I was utterly unknown, but I spent what seems like hours being available in case someone wanted to talk to me). To make it worse, I did not know many people out there who were not actually Oracle employees, and oracle employees found it hard to get into things as priority was given to attendees. I felt pretty alone amongst 45,000 people interested in the same Tech as me. I did not even realise I had to sign up for the top talks and by the time I knew, they were all full. I did stumble into some very good Other Talks by accident though.

So, what should I be doing? What great talks should I be signing up for and which fantastic social events should I be trying to get invited to/slotted into my agenda? I don’t even know if many events are by-invite-only…

After over a decade of doing other conferences (and helping organise a few!), I feel a bit like a conference newbie again…

All help for a lonely out-of-towner gratefully received!

A couple of up-coming user group meetings August 18, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in Meeting notes, Presenting, User Groups.
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There are a couple of user group meetings in the UK that I’ll be attending (and talking at) in September.

On the 15th September I’ll be presenting at the UKOUG Database Server SIG in the Oracle London City office, talking about PL/SQL & SQL performance. I’m not exactly sure what I’ll be covering yet, I have a few areas I’d like to talk about so I’ll have to pick one to do it justice. The meeting starts at 09:30 and is of course free to anyone with UKOUG membership (excepting the Bronze membership which only a few people have) – anyone can pay a small fee to come along. Contact the UKOUG or ask me if you want details. I’m pretty sure there will be some of us in a nearby public house after the event too.

The next meeting is the Yorkshire Database meeting on Tuesday 22nd September, from 18:30. This is the third YoDB event and I know they have been very good. I’ll be doing my talk on the fundamentals of Oracle’s architecture. I’m really quite excited about this meeting {and I know it is often a false “sell” thing to say about any IT event} because (a) it is a small, local grass-roots user group that I’ve helped promote and yet will be the first I’ll manage to get to and(b) I was at college in Leeds and so have a soft spot for the place. I still have some friends up there. This event is free to all but you DO have to register using the link above.

As ever, it’s great to meet people so please come over and say “hi” if you are at either event.

I’m hoping the postponed cluboracle meeting will happen in September too but either a new date has not been announced or it went by me.

If you want to see what events I’ll be at in the later quarter of the year, you can check out the “appearances and meetings” tab. It’s mostly smaller things like OOW and UKOUG Tech15 :-)

Friday Philosophy – Being Rejected by the Prom Queen July 13, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in conference, Friday Philosophy, Presenting, Tech15.
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If you follow me on twitter (and if you are on twitter, why would you *not* follow me :-) See Twitter tag on right of page -> ) you will know what the title is all about. I posted the below on my twitter feed a few weeks ago:

Submitting to speak at #OOW15 is like asking out prom queens. You live in hope – but expect rejection :-)

{BTW if prom queens are not your thing and you would rather be asking out the captain of the football/ice hockey/chess team, the vampire slayer or whatever, just substitute as you see fit.}

I’ve not submitted to Oracle Open World for years – in fact, I’ve never submitted papers to OOW. Of the two times I have spoken at the conference, once was at the request of an Oracle product manager as the “friendly customer” in his talk {I did 75% of the talking and was not even mentioned on the agenda!} and the other I was actually presenting back at Redwood Shores at an Oracle Life Science conference running parallel to OOW. Both were a decade ago. But this year I decided to give it a shot and put forward 3 talks – all technical but intro talks, which I thought they would like as it would be a nice balance to much of the content, which is either deep technical stuff or, more often, “how great is Oracle” presentations on the latest stuff. And for 2015, endless fluffy Clouds.

I know it is hard to get accepted at OOW and, despite my personal, utter conviction that my talks would be brilliant and wow the audience, I had no great hopes. I was up against the Oracle-Presenting-Equivalent of the Sports Jocks and children-of-the-fabulously-wealthy at college. But for a short & wonderful period, I actually thought she was going to say “yes”!!! You see, lots of my friends who had also “asked out the prom queen” were tweeting that they had been rejected. But I had not, no email in my inbox saying that whilst I was cute, we were not right for each other. In fact, when the odd tweet went out from people saying that one or two of their talks had been rejected but not all, I started to think I was going to slam-dunk the whole affair and get all 3 talks in! What would be the equivalent of that with the Prom Queen? Probably stuff her dad would not be happy about.

But no, I’d forgotten I’d submitted under my ORA600 email address and when I remembered, I found the email waiting there. All three rejected. No dancing with the Prom Queen for me. *sigh*. It was like she’d not only turned me down but rung up my mum to refuse my offer of a date, rather than tell me direct. I would not have found it so hard to take if only, for that short while, I thought I was going to get a “yes”.

I suppose it is only fair. I’ve been on the panel of people choosing the content for the database part of the UK Oracle User Group Tech15 conference in Birmingham. Notification for acceptance or rejection of submitted papers to that event went out just a day or two before the OOW notifications and I knew some of my friends were going to be disappointed. I worried about that a little, they knew I had been involved in the choice and so was partly responsible for them not being selected. {I really hope that the person who told me to stay on holiday in Montenegro as they knew where I lived was kidding….}.

OOW15 and UKOUG Tech15 actually had a common issue I believe – less physical space for talks. I’ve been told that the Moscone centre has been overhauled and some space is still not ready. For Tech15 we are sharing space with Apps again so do not have as much room as we would ideally like. However, the main issue (again for both events) is just the number of good presentations by good speakers that we get. If we had space for 6 concurrent database streams at the same time (we do have space for 4 or 3, depending on the day) we would still have more than enough good talks – and the delegates would have to be picking between maybe 3 or 4 talks out of the 6 that they personally would like to see – and feeling they were missing out no matter what.

I’ll say more at a later date about how we actually pick the talks (the post is half written) but the take home message for anyone rejected from UKOUG Tech15 this year is:
(a) The competition was strong.
(b) You have a known target for your anger (Look, it really is 90% decided by the judging scores!!!)
(b) You can take comfort schadenfreude in the knowledge that I (and several other committee members) have suffered exactly the same disappointment as you. Maybe worse for me – for a while I was convinced the haughty little minx was going to say yes….

If you got rejected by OOW15 then I think the important things to keep in mind are:
(a) It’s all just Sales Pitch & Company flag waving & cloud-cloud-cloud and you never really liked that prom queen anyway. {Me? Bitter?}
(b) There is a stellar line up of people who have also been rejected. Try checking out the twitter tag #TeamRejectedByOracleOpenWorld {quick nod to Tim Hall for coming up with a such a funny idea}.
(c) At least you put in for it. The one way to be sure you won’t get something is to not try.

Oh well, there is always next year. If my ego has recovered by then. I quite fancy the new captain of the chess team…

No Local Oracle User Group? Oh Well, Go to a Bar… April 28, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in Presenting, User Groups.
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Is there no local Oracle user group in your area? Do you wish you could share experiences with like-minded people? Is there no opportunity to talk about the technology you work with? Do you feel you would benefit from expanding your network of friends and contacts? But without a local user group it’s really hard to do any of that! – At least face-to-face. And, let’s face it, meeting for real really does beat meeting on-line. I know, you are sad about it.

Well, go to a bar. Have a drink, it might make you feel better. Especially if you go with Dave in your team. Ask your friend across town along who also works with Oracle Tech. And maybe she could bring her friend who is an Oracle DBA too.

Well done! You now have an Oracle User Group!

It really is that simple to start a user group. You do not need an organisation, you do not need membership and you do not need presenters. You just need three of you and a place to meet. I might be saying a bar above (or, in England, it would be a local Pub, my good chap) but it can be a coffee house, a cafe, a wine bar, the local library maybe or anywhere you can meet easily and relax. Obviously increasing from 3 to 4 to 5 etc makes it all more interesting with more stories, tips and experiences to share.

I’m in a user group just like that, it’s called the LOB – London Oracle Beers. We started in around 2009, 2010. Initially it was myself, Neil Chandler and Doug Burns occasionally meeting for a pint or three (and later arguing about who started LOB). Soon Pete Scott was joining us, then Dawn, then Graham {what happened to Graham?} then Martin Bach… It got serious when I put together a mail list. We’ve been going ever since and although the regularity of the meetings fluctuates, as does the size of the group, it seems to keep going at between once a month to once every 3 months. Thinking about it, we are due a get-together.

How to Start a Small, Social User Group

There is one thing that IS needed for a user group like the above, and in fact for the others I am going to mention.

You need someone to regularly say “let’s meet”.

It does not need to be one person, it can be shared between several people. In the current LOB it is mostly myself that sends out a call but Neil does too. Anyone in the group can make the call and occasionally others do (Dawn, Pete) and some ask me to make the call on their behalf, which I do even if I can’t attend. But that’s really all you need, someone to make the call.

The other thing you need to do is, as a group, invite some others along. Not everyone you can think of, for a social user group let it grow at a steady, organic rate. People drop in and out of user groups so you need to constantly keep an eye on things and if the numbers drop, ask a few others. People’s lives and circumstances alter so they can’t come or they just decide they’ve had enough and that’s fine. For this sort of social-centric user group I would suggest you stick to inviting friends and friendly contacts and try not to let it get too large (A nice problem for a user group to have!)

So Just Do it! If you do not have a local user group and you want one, be the person to ask a couple of friends and if there are 3 or more of you, make that call. And a month or two later, make the call again. The worst that will happen is that it won’t take off and, if it does not, you know you tried (and not many people will know you failed :-) ). I’d honestly be surprised if it does not at least take off for a while.

The Presenting User Group

Another sort of user group is where you start off by wanting it to be a bit more structured, to have presentations involved. This does take more organisation: a location where you can present (it does not have to be the same place each time), someone to present and it helps if you have a sponsor. As having somewhere to speak may well involve renting a room and it’s nice if you can offer some drinks and snacks. You don’t need a lot of sponsorship (if any). Ask some local Oracle-centric firms, the worst they will say is “no” and the best they will say is “sure, here is enough money for some pizza and Rohan in the Dev team is happy to talk about Blargh at the first meeting”. But work out what you need (say rental on the room and enough for a couple of Samosas for everyone) and only ask for what you need. Your sponsor may well want to put up a banner or have someone say something but that is part of the deal.

I’m involved in two such user groups in the UK at the moment:

Oracle Midlands run by Mike Mckay-Dirden. They are about to have their 8th meeting (Follow the link <- over there), on the 19th May in their usual location in Aston, Birmingham. I managed to get to most of their first meetings, spoke at one and sadly missed the last couple due to timing clashes. Might be true for this next one too :-(. Mike does brilliantly on this, he got a local firm (or part of the firm) Red Stack Technology to sponsor him and he has the gall to ask Oracle Ace Directors and other known people to speak :-)

Club Oracle London was started by Jonathan Lewis (I think prompted by the LOB and also what Mike was doing – but don’t blame Jonathan if I have my facts wrong) and is sponsored and run by e-DBA but with a very light touch. This will be their 4th or 5th meeting. I’m speaking at this one and I’ve been to all of them. Again, follow the link for more details and to register for the event on Thursday.

If you visit my blog often or follow me on Twitter you will have seen me promote these events. I’m very keen to support smaller, local user groups.

Again, it needs someone to Make The Call and also get at least the first speaker(s), but you can share the load for that. The other difference is that you probably want to spread the call a little wider. Tweet about it, use Facebook and all those other social media things.  Tell all the people you know who might be interested and ask them to spread the word as you want a reasonable crowd for the speaker.

There is more to organising these more formal user groups but nothing that one determined person or a small group of fairly determined people cannot make happen.

Larger User Groups

The next step up are the large user groups where you have membership and paid-for events, like national, regional (or state in the US) user groups. You need a run up to create one of those! However, they are still user groups, they are all part of the “environment” of the total user community.

These user groups can still be created by a small number of people but doing so is a bigger task and I suggest you contact other people who are involved in such things and really plan what you want to achieve – it’s a topic beyond a single blog post like this. But it can be done and it can grow out of the two sorts of user group above.

I would like to highlight that starting your own local, small user group should be no barrier to being part of the large user groups. I attend, promote and present at the small user groups. Heck, you could say I run one with the LOB (along with other people). However, I am an active member of the UKOUG, deputy-chairing a Special Interest Group that meets 3 times a year and I’m involved in organising the content of UKOUG Tech15 (See the banner -> over there -> – at the time of writing the Call for Papers is open ). We can all live together.


Getting Speakers

If you want a speaker at your event (which you can have at the social sort of user group but you need to make sure the speaker is not expecting a projector and can’t user powerpoint!) then you can ask someone in your group to do it, you can do it yourself (we all have knowledge and experience to contribute) or you could try to get a speaker outside your group.

If you are trying to start up the more formal Presenting User Group then a known name will help draw people to your event. But there is the danger that not enough people will turn up for the speaker! You will worry about that. Well, don’t. Just be honest with the speaker about the numbers you expect and be realistic. In many ways I personally like smaller crowds and I know other speakers who do. I’d rather have 5 enthusiastic people than 50 indifferent ones.

Obviously, the more geographically local the speaker is the more likely they will say yes  and asking the stellar stars is likely to get a “no” as they are simply too busy – but if they are Local-local, they may say yes! Remember, potential speakers have to earn a living so are not available at the drop of a hat and some only do conferences. Again, the worst you will get is a “no”.

I’ll make an offer – If you decide to start such a group in the UK and you need a presenter, let me know. I can’t promise but I’ll try to oblige. If you are further afield I’m afraid it is less likely I can help as I have to pay my own travel and expenses. But you never know, the odd jaunt over to Europe does happen.

Also, try looking up local Oracle ACEs and OakTable members. Again,they might say no, they might say yes but Oracle ACEs and OakTable members are generally inclined to help, it’s a large part of why we have those labels.


As the annoying advert says “Just Do It”

So in summary: If you want a user group and there is not one, maybe you can start one. If you want it to be a little more formal with presentations, look for a sponsor and ask some local Oracle Names if they would present.

Good Luck!

My Oracle Life of Clubbing & Harmony March 31, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in conference, Presenting.
Tags: , ,

Last year I promised myself I would do more conferences & presenting and that it would include more events further afield, such as in Europe. I can’t say I managed it in 2014 (Liverpool for the UKOUG Tech14 did not count as a foreign country for me, even if I found a couple of the locals hard to understand) but 2015 is proving more successful. I attended the OUG Ireland conference 2 weeks ago, for my first trip to that country, and I learnt recently that I have papers accepted for Harmony 2015. This conference is a joint event between the Oracle user group of Finland, the Oracle user group of Estonia and the Latvian Oracle user group.

The conference is on the 11th and 12th of June in Tallinn, Estonia. I know that a few of my friends I’ve met in the flesh will also be there but also some people I only know online and who I’m looking forward to meeting for real {and one who I am not sure if I have met in the flesh or not!!!}. That’s part of why I like going to conferences; It is nice to get to know people via electronic means but there is nothing like actually being in the same room and chatting, especially if it is relaxing over a coffee, beer or a meal.

However, I am particularly happy to be going to Tallinn as my wife has been there and loves it. We are trying to organise it so that she can come over as well, but she has her own travel commitments that vary from week to week. Sue knows how to say “can you punch my ticket” in Estonian – and she assures me this is not a euphemism for anything.

In case Sue cannot make it, she has given me the book she learnt from, so I can learn Estonian myself:

Learn Estonian - in Russian!

Learn Estonian – in Russian!

First I have to learn Russian though… Yes, it’s a Russian “How to learn Estonian” book.

Have you any idea how much pleasure she took in doing that to me?

So that is the Harmony. What about the Clubbing? That would be Club Oracle London, which is a user group I mention each time there is a meeting. It is in London in the evening and there are 3 talks, beer, pizza and lots of chat between the crowd & the presenters. I’m doing my Disasters talk at the next meeting on the 30th April. Click that link to register and secure your place, it’s free. The other presenters are Svetoslav Gyurov and Dominic Giles. Dom is being particularly brave and is offering to answer any questions people have about the database {“as honestly as I can”}. I’ve known Dom for years, he used to come over to the place I worked when we were doing a lot of beta testing of Oracle. He secured his place in my admiration by not only thoroughly knowing his stuff but also when he told me off for being pathetic and not pushing the new tech and that I was being a wimp. Utter honesty from the vendor works for me.

I’ve currently got nothing else organised for 2015 conference-wise (apart from the small issue of helping define the technical content for UKOUG Tech15! So I guess I will be there. Oh, and probably a couple of SIGs). I keep saying I’ll try to do Bulgaria but again I’d like to get that to work with going with Sue. And of course, I could put in for Oracle Open World 15, but it’s a loooong way to go and costs me a lot. And Larry does not seem to want to talk to me anymore.

Who Plans The Content of UKOUG Tech15? March 26, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in conference, Tech15, UKOUG.
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<..Who are the Tech15 committee and my role
….submitting an abstract..>

When you go to a conference like UKOUG Tech15 there are hundreds of talks given over several days and a dozen or so streams. Who decides what is presented and how do they decide?

You do. Well, I’d say you have about 60-70% of the input, if you are a member of the UKOUG (and I know many reading this are not – but you are probably members {via your employer, if not personally} of other user groups. And, if you are not, you can probably benefit from joining one.) The point is, the members of the UK Oracle User Group have a fair say in what gets talked about at the UKOUG conferences. And, though not all are run in the same way, I know several of the large oracle conferences run on similar principles. You also provide the raw material, the proposed talks. That is open to each and every one of you, member or not. Anyone can offer a talk.

What about the other 30-40% of the input? Well, that would be me :-). {Note, British ironic humour}. As I mentioned in my first post about organising Tech15 I am the Lead for the database area this year, and some people did blame me last year for the content – but being the Lead does not put me in charge. There is a technical committee that decides what they feel should be the overall structure of the conference and have the final 30-40% say in what talks are given.

I’ll go into more details about aspect of the paper selection process in future posts, but the general structure is thus:

  • The steering committee meet for a kick-off meeting and decide on:
    • Who is in which committee (though this is pretty much sorted out before the meeting).
    • the general structure of the event – The major areas (Database, Middleware, Development, Business Analytics and Hardware/OS/Engineered), the number of streams each major area gets each day, the length of sessions and if anything is happening outside the main 3 days of the conference.
    • How we handle the labeling of topics in our streams (endless discussions there!).
    • Topics and considerations that we feel are important to our streams that should be mentioned in the call for papers.
    • How we will run the sub-committees and overall committee – again, this is generally known but we look at what we learnt the prior year and change accordingly.
  • The call for papers goes out (it will be the 13th April to 10th May this year). This is advertised by the UKOUG, being sent to previous paper submitters, the User Group members and is announced in the UKOUG mailings, tweeted and several other avenues. The committee will have suggested areas to submit for, but what is submitted is up to the presenting community – and this can alter our thoughts on content.
  • Judging – From 20th April to close to the Agenda Planning Day, volunteers and members of UKOUG are asked to judge the paper abstracts. These scores are important for the next step…
  • Agenda Planning Day – the steering committee members get together and spend pretty much a whole day reviewing the abstracts, the judging scores, the slots available, what we know of the speakers and presentations, the spread of topics, percentage of established and new speakers and half a dozen other things to come up with the rough agenda. It’s a bit of a bun fight, but we get there in the end. Every abstract is looked at along with it’s judging score.
  • Speakers are informed if their papers are accepted, rejected or we would like them as reserves – and the speakers confirm or decline acceptance or reserves (and occasionally question rejections). Sometimes a speaker will be asked if they would modify a submission.
  • The technical committees may well try and source some papers where we feel a topic is under-represented or to fit with some other aim (like a stream at a given level).
  • Reserves are slotted in to replace any speakers who decline and any clashes, alterations and agenda tweaks are dealt with as they arise.
  • The agenda is launched (ie we say what is on it) mid July.
  • From the agenda launch to the start of the conference, any paper changes are handled as they come up – usually a speaker pulling out or needing to change dates but occasionally other issues.

Why is it called “Paper Selection” when people are talking? Why do we talk about abstracts? Well, conferences pretty much started off as scientific conferences and you would submit you scientific paper – and then read it out to the conference. The abstract is a brief “why you should read my 35 page argument with long, impressive words for why I think hyaenas are more closely related to cats than dogs” {they are}. We inherit those terms.

So you can see that the steering committee has a fair input, so how do WE get chosen? Fundamentally, it is via a call for volunteers from the UKOUG community. The UKOUG ask people to volunteer in their regular emails to members/volunteers. (Volunteers have to be members of the UKOUG but the membership may well belong to a company. The UKOUG keeps track of the nominated contacts for an organisation, who are responsible for the membership management, but also the individuals who have helped out at any time under that membership. As an example, someone in purchasing or HR may be the nominated contact for the memberships a company has with UKOUG, but it is members of the technical IT staff who come to the events and may start helping out).
The office UKOUG staff/board members may well ask one or two of the experienced volunteers known to them to take a lead and help chose which volunteers to accept. Or, more commonly, to go and pester people they know to step up and volunteer! New volunteers are always part of the mix, we recognise that without new people and perspectives we will stagnate, and they challenge us when we say “we always do it this way”.

I have not mentioned Oracle Corporation involvement. Strictly speaking, people from Oracle are not volunteers and are certainly not members. They are Oracle Liaisons. The UKOUG gets good support from Oracle, we have talks from them, we have some SIG meetings in their offices. Oracle Corporation of course is happy to talk about the latest/greatest aspects of Oracle and if they can get us all fired up for an extra cost option, so much the better for them. But the relationship is generally balanced and varies over the years – and is influenced by individuals. Some people who work for Oracle will push to be allowed to help out the UKOUG, some product managers are more than happy to come and give talks about free, standard or old features as well as the shiny new stuff. Others I am sure see us as an annoyance. The input we get from the Oracle Liaisons is very helpful and appreciated – but don’t think it buys acceptance of whatever Oracle Corp want. I had to help deal with an Oracle product manager last year who was upset that their area had very few talks. It got as far as them almost demanding some slots. However, the number of talks submitted and the poor judging scores for those few that were told us on the committee that the user community were not currently interested in that topic. So no talks. Faye and I talked it over, I gave the logic and reason and she was good enough to then deal with Upset Product Manager.

I have helped with the agenda planning day a couple of time – I think I got pestered to help way back in 2007 or 8! – and I have been a SIG chair and deputy chair as well as a regular presenter, so I am a known soft-touch for helping the UKOUG. A key aspect to my being the Lead is simply that I have more free time than most other volunteers, so I can be got hold of and can spend a bit of time thinking about things and making decisions. This can be important on the run-up to the actual event as you sometimes need to make decisions quickly and a group discussion may not be the best way to do it. I might check with a couple of others (and I usually do) but the key thing is to make a decision in the timeframe allowed.

So that is who the Agenda Planning committee are and where we fit in. We are volunteers, filtered and guided by some old hands but with new blood each year. We aim to guide and give structure but the talks submitted are what anyone wants to submit. Judging scores by the community are key to paper selection and though Oracle Corp supports they don’t get to dictate.

And if all else fails, blame the committee Leads.

Extra session at OUG Ireland – Oracle Lego. March 12, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in database design, development, Presenting.
Tags: , , ,
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I’m now doing a second session at OUG Ireland 2015. {This is because one of the accepted speakers had to drop out – it sometimes happens that, despite your best intentions, you can’t make the conference and it is better to let them know as soon as you can, as they did}. This will be a talk called “Oracle Lego” and it is one I put together a couple of years ago when I decided to try and do more introductory talks – talks aimed at those who are not {yet} experts and who I think tend to get ignored by most conference and user group agenda. So it is aimed at those new to oracle or experts in other areas who have never really touched on the subject.

“Oracle Lego” is about the basics of database design. I have a personal soap box I occasionally get on that very little real database design seems to occur these days. There are exceptions, but often the database design seems to be a quick brain-dump of what the developers or business analysts know they need to store information about and the first-cut set of tables gets created – and then endlessly modified as the development rolls on.

Guess what, we don’t build houses, cars, ships, bridges or garden sheds like that – and there is a reason. If you build things piecemeal as you go along and with bits you either have to hand or have to quickly get, you end up with a pretty poor shed. In fact you don’t end up with a shed, you end up with a shack. With a leaking roof and a door that hits the potting table when you open it. I don’t want a shack and I never, ever want to go over a bridge or sail in a ship built “on the hoof” like that!

Further, just as with a proper architectural or engineering design, a database design does not fix the solution in stone, there is still scope for modification. A bespoke house plan gets tweaked and modified as you do the build and you realise what can be improved when you see it – but you do not suddenly decide to dig out a basement and change from wood walls to stone when you have already constructed the ground floor! I’ve seen database “designs” like this.

There is also more to doing a database design than coming up with tables that hold the records we want to store: We might want to consider if storing similar things in the same table could be better than a table for each “type” of something; How we index those tables and relate them together can have a huge impact on how easy it is to get the data out and store it in the first place; The expected volume and life cycle of the data may require us to consider eg archiving; The very-much-ignored aspect of physical placement of data and clustering of data.

You can spend weeks dedicated to learning about database design – but you can also learn a lot in 60 minutes, ie the basics. And it really is like Lego – once you know the basics you can build up a really complex design. And you learn stuff doing it (and turning it into a real system), just like you do the first time you build a Lego robot (or dog or house or car or bridge or spaceship or whatever). So the second time you build your Lego robot you use the same design basics and layer on top what you learnt last time.

So that is the aim of this talk, the basics of database design.

The strange thing is, last time I did this talk I asked the audience how much database design they did. Every single one of them was already an experienced and capable database designer! So why had they come to this intro talk? They had three reasons:

  1. It was the only talk on database design at the conference, and one more than they were used to getting.
  2. They had picked up their database design skills on-the-job and thought a “reminder” of the basics would be good.
  3. It was cold outside and all the other talks appealed less.

So, this time I am hoping some of the audience is new to database design and I get to teach them great stuff they did not know. If it is all experts again, I think I’ll have to retire this particular intro talk, at least for conferences.

As you can see from the agenda grid here, I’ll be talking at 10:15. You can’t link to an abstract of the talk yet, that just needs to be twiddled into place.

Update – Peter Scott stopped by this blog and it prompted a thought. He felt it was too much at a tangent to add as a comment but I felt it was a very valid and valuable point – so check it out over here on his blog.

BTW Pete has started blogging more, on his thoughts and opinions on Data Warehousing. Personally I think it is worth catching them.

{Oh, and in case any lawyers stop by, “Lego” is of course the copyright name of a popular plastic construction toy, made by the Danish company The Lego Group, that children love playing with and adults hate walking on in bare feet. Did anyone not know that?!?! I have no link to The Lego Group and no plastic bricks will form part of my talk.}

Useful list of Oracle Conferences and Call For Papers March 9, 2015

Posted by mwidlake in conference, Tech15.
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Do you want to know what Oracle conferences are run, where they are and when? Do you present (or are thinking of presenting) and want to know when the call for papers is open?

Then go and look at Jan Karremans’ excellent page on oracle conferences.

It lists most (all?) of the European and US conferences and is a really useful reference – I’ve not come across a similar, maintained list. The below is a static screen shot of part of the list, current of today – but visit the page to see the full, maintained list.

Jan's conference list

If you spot that a conference you know about (or are helping organise!) is missing, then Jan is happy to be contacted via the page and he will add the details.


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