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The end of the Management and Infrastructure SIG – What Next? October 10, 2011

Posted by mwidlake in Meeting notes.
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The 27th September was in some ways a sad day for me. It was the last of the UKOUG Management and Infrastructure Special Interest Group meetings. This SIG was dedicated to looking at how you cope with Oracle as part of a large or complex organisation. The last audience was bijou and compact but the speakers were cracking, as is confirmed by the excellent feedback everyone received from the post event critique forms.

It’s always been a SIG with a small crowd come that came along, but it was also a SIG that some of us were screaming out for. Those SIGs and meetings dedicated to the hard-core technical sides of the Oracle RDBMS are of course great and much appreciated. But for those of us trying to manage a couple of thousand instances of Oracle/application server, or trying to look after the database within the sort of corporate IT forest that FTSE 100 organisations have to have, some of us were really keen to better understand the rest of the IT infrastructure, methods to look after such large Oracle estates and also the human side of things – that word “management”. I know that the word “management” in the title put a few people off the events, but for others it was the management side (human AND technical) we desperately wanted.

So, why has it ended? Well, it hasn’t really – we are merging with the RAC&HA SIG, chaired by David Burnham and his deputies. There is a lot of crossover between our areas and we found we were often using the same speakers. You do not tend to have RAC if you are not a large oracle site and you tend to be very interested in High Availability if you have a lot of Oracle stuff to look after. So, from next year, we will be the AIM SIG – availability, Infrastructure and Management SIG. It might not be a snappy label but it describes what we will be about. Details of this new SIG will be discussed at the conference in December, anyone with any thoughts on the subject is more than welcome to contact me.

This leaves me with one important task and that is to note my thanks and indebtedness to some of those who helped with the SIG.
The UKOUG staff have been great at supporting the events, especially (during my stint) Michelle Ericsson (who is now doing funky DJ stuff in the USA) and Marisa Harris, who picked up our SIG for this last meeting and was great at hearding her errant Chair and Deputy Chair into doing what we needed to do.

We have had a succession of good guys from Oracle help us out. Tony Clements was our first and longest serving Oracle buddy and Simon Moreton took up the cause after Tony went to pastures new. Mike Edgington pitched in at short notice when Simon was not available to us for this last meeting, even presenting. Special thanks also go to Andrew Bulloch who has been fantastic at giving or organising talks for us by Oracle on Enterprise manager and Grid.

Finally and most importantly I’d like to thank Neil Chandler. Neil has been the deputy chair since the SIG started and is probably – no, IS – the person who has done the most to support the M&I SIG through it’s life. Neil’s one of those people who does not push himself to the fore as he should (except maybe in the pub), resisting presenting and firmly holding one step back from being the chair. I don’t know why, he presents very well and he knows a lot of stuff.

To everyone who came to any of the meetings and especially those who allowed themselves to be drafted into presenting duties, thank you very much indeed.

Advert – MI SIG on 5th October September 13, 2010

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The next UK Oracle User Group (UKOUG) Management and Infrastructure SIG is coming up in a few weeks – 5th October in the Oracle City Office. You can find the latest agenda here. If you do not know what we (the MI SIG) cover, it is basically technical topics at a slightly broader level. So not so much example code but how feature X works or how to use Y over 100 databases plus. We also touch on management issues, which I always worry will put some potential attendees of,f but in fact nearly always goes down very well.

We have an excellent line up of topics and presenters for this meeting. Does Exadata work in the real world? Peter Scott will be presenting some of what he has learned doing this. Want to know about oracle’s latest licensing options and how to save money? Alex Sandercock from Turnstone Services will be talking about that. Confused about how storage is changing and how the database interacts with it? James Moorle will cover that one.

It has been a real struggle getting the agenda together for this meeting, I can’t believe we have ended up with such a strong one in the end. I mean, I am not even having to bore everyone with my voice again.

The first problem was I just failed to get the organising started. As the Chair, it is my main function to sort out the meetings. It was always “tomorrow” as I had so much on for every “today”.

The second problem was we were up against Oracle Open World. We had a few people “in hand” who had indicated they would be happy to do a talk for us, but were scheduled to do OOW. I thought it was a bit mean to turn us down for some obscure vendor event in the US. So we moved our event by a month.

The final problem was that we still had trouble with speaker availability, as it was now so close (it might not seem close if you are considering going to a meeting, but if you are being asked to sign up to preparing and giving a presentation, 5 weeks is not a lot of notice).

It all came together in the end, with the help of the co-chairs, especially Neil Chandler.

I know I have said this before, but I struggle to understand why SIG meetings are not flooded with people coming to them. It is free training in effect (if your organisation is a member of the UKOUG – £80 otherwise, I think). All the presenters are experts, often presenting similar talks to those given at Oracle Open World or the UKOUG Conference. OK, it is a day not working in the office but as well as the “free training” you meet up with other people who have similar work issues as you. I find it invaluable to have a circle of external people I can occasionally say “What do you think of this” to. The meeting other people is aided by us retiring to a pub after the event, for those inclined to do so.

I try to get to SIGs when I can and in fact, if I was not at my own on the 5th, I’d like to be at the modelling and architecture one – I’ve been meaning to get to that one for ages.

Advert for the Management and Infrastructure SIG March 24, 2010

Posted by mwidlake in Management, Meeting notes.
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I’m a bit late doing this (life is just too busy at the moment) but I want to mention the next Management and Infrastructure Special Interest Group meeting of the UKOUG next Week. Tuesday 30th, being held in Oracle’s London City office.

I get asked by people what exactly the MI SIG is? {Honest, I do, I got asked twice this month alone!}. Is it a management meeting or is it another one of the technical SIGs, like the UNIX, RDBMS and RAC/HA SIGs? I’ve struggled to come up with a single line to sum it up. Other than to say “Both”.

It might be easier to sum up the target audience. The MI SIG is for technical people who need to deal with Oracle as a component of a large IT environment. Most of the audience could knock up a PL/SQL script to create a new set of tablespaces each month, would be able to instal Oracle {if given a couple of days and the manuals to peek at} and could explain two-phase commit. Maybe.
But what they have to deal with in their working lives are things like using Grid Control to manage 500 instances, understand what options are there for providing disaster recovery {if not the exact commands to eg set up physical standby or active/passive RAC}, knowing enough about storage options to make a sensible decision on which is best for each type of Oracle system they have. So it is a technical SIG, but covering general principles and, well, Infrastructure.

And the Management? Well, when the SIG started this bit was really interesting to me. When you have a lot of IT going on, especially in large organisations, the people looking after Oracle are not the people looking after Networks, or Storage, or Backups or half a dozen other things. And you probably have a team of people doing all that Oracle stuff with/for you. So you have to hire staff and keep ‘em happy and deal with teams who you have no power over but you need them to do stuff for you. And that Management part can be a lot harder than the technology, especially if you never planned on being a manager but just woke up one day with that monkey on your back.

So with the technical aspects of Large IT Infrastructure comes the management component too. The SIG is there for that audience.

I chair this SIG, so I am more than a little bit biased, but I think it is a good line-up of talks for this up-coming meeting. We have two talks on using OEM/Grid Control, one around using it for deploying clusters, one about how you go about integrating it with the likes of LDAP, Kerbros and using the Custom Metrics, ie plugging it into the wider infrastructure.

We also have a presentation on the latest/greatest Exadata2, from some Oracle friends.

To wrap up the technical talks I am going to try and explain some of the guiding principles for gathering statistics for you oracle databases. Not the details of DBMS_STATS command syntax, but why you need good stats, how you get them and the issues we all seem to end up facing with it.

Balancing the techical side is a talk on Birkman and understanding teams and people.

So, you can see it is a line-up matching the diversity of the SIG’s purpose.

As I said earlier, I initially was very interested in the management side of the SIG and I worried I would be pretty lonely in that opinion. For various reasons, those of us on the technical side tend not to have much time for those “soft skills” we associate with management theory. However, when I took over the SIG over a year ago, I asked the audience if they would want some talks on hiring staff, dealing with people, motivation… Over 60% of the audience said “YES!”. Quite loudly. About 30% said “OK, so long as we get technical stuff as well”. 6% said “over my dead body”.

I think the reason so many wanted the management side as well is, whether we like it or have an affinity for it or not, it is part of the job. And so we need to be able to do it. Personally, I quite like the human side of IT, but my wife tells me I am strange.

If your organisation has UKOUG membership it is free to come along to the SIG (one person per membership, excluding Bronze membership) Anyone can come along for £80. You would be very welcome and I am sure you will learn new stuff. Don’t let the fact that we retire to a pub afterwards where the chair buys a round sway your decision to come along at all.

Free Training (next Management and Infrastructure SIG) September 17, 2009

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The next Management and Infrastructure SIG is coming up, 1st October in Oracle City office in London. The agenda and details can be found here.

I think the line up is a good balance of technical and management, which is what the SIG is all about – but then I am biased :-)
Real Application Testing, ASH/AWR, how to hire staff, Grid control for complex sites and flexible e-business suite architecture are all covered, plus the chance to ask questions of our Oracle Support representative (Along the lines of “how do I best escalate SRs”, not “what does bug number 2324567.1 on linux not happen on hp-ux”).

As some of you know, I currently chair the SIG {for those who do not know, a SIG is a Special Interest Group of the UK Oracle User Group}. The event is free to those with UKOUG membership {excluding bronze I think} and anyone can come along for £80.

Numbers for SIGs have been hit by the recession over the last 12 months – people’s travel budgets being slashed, pressure on staff/managers of staff that everyone always “looks busy”, reduced access to things that can be seen as a perk.

However, it strikes me as odd that SIGs don’t become more popular when things are tight. After all, they are in effect free (or cheap) training and opportunities to make or maintain contacts with people you can share experiences with. There are also domain experts around who love to talk about their chosen topic, so potentially free consultancy too.

If you have any interest in the topics covered, I’d encourage you to come along for some of this free stuff :-) Likewise, keep an eye on the other UKOUG SIG events, there is usually very good stuff at all of them.

June Management & Infrastructure meeting June 5, 2009

Posted by mwidlake in Meeting notes, Perceptions.
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Wednesday this week saw the first UKOUG Management & Infrastructure meeting special interest group meeting (MI SIG) of the year – postponed from April due to a clash with the G20 summit. You can see details of the meeting here where {if you are a member of the UKOUG} you can download some of the papers.

I feel the MI SIG has been struggling a little over the last few meetings – too many sales pitch presentations and numbers hit by travel woes (we just fell unlucky) and then the recession – but this meeting felt better. We had a good mix of strong presentations and numbers were up. The number of expected delegates has been very variable over the last 2 weeks, at one point we were full (50 people) but then some dropped out, others registered late. We ended up with 39.

At the last meeting I asked if people wanted more on the management side and the majority did, so I pitched a presentation about how to be a Manger in IT. It would have been relevant to management in other disciplines but IT does have some unusal aspects, one being that there is a much higher percentage of introvert and logical personality traits amongst IT people. Soft Skills and considerations of personality do tend to get short change in technology environments too.

Not only did I pitch a touchy-feely topic but I also went powerpoint-naked. I put up a half dozen intro slides and then turned off the projector and just talked. I was more than a tad anxious that this could have fallen flat and ended up as me spewing random drivel from the front, but the audience took up the topic and started chipping in. It snowballed and became a general discussion. I managed to keep it flowing and mentioned most of the things I wanted to include and also took a lot of input from the audience. Maybe one or two of the links I made to add my intended points were a bit tenuous but heck, it was the first time I’d done a free-form presentation like that for years and years.

Not only was the session a success {phew} but it seemed to set the pattern for the rest of day. We had had some good questions being asked of John Nangle during his opening presentation on Exadata (I’d really like to get my hands on one of those units) but after the free-form session everyone seemed to be talking to each other more and all presenters had questions and little discussions to deal with during their sessions. They all dealt with them well.

We rounded off the meeting with a drink in a local hostelry for those who were inclined and the discussions kept going. The general feeling was that it had been an excellent day with people being a lot more interactive than normal. I know other SIGs use “speed chatting” and other things to help encourage people to talk to other delegates. They have found that such things might not initially be popular {what! you want me to talk to strangers?} but always give the meetings a greater feeling of interaction and delegate feedback is that they are {sometimes reluctanatly} recognised as helpful.

I think I’ll try and have some sort of interactive or ice-breaking aspect at future meetings as it seems to really help the day be a success.

Management And Infrastructure SIG May 28, 2009

Posted by mwidlake in Management, Meeting notes.
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It is the next Mangement and Infrastructure Special Interest Group meeting next week (MI SIG), on Wednesday 3rd June.

I currently chair the MI SIG and, just as Andrew Clark says about the Development and Engineering SIG, “it is not as sexy as it sounds” {The chairing, I mean, the SIG itself is incredibly sexy and wonderful}. It basically means I spend a few days 2 or 3 times a year helping organise the event, strongly supported by the UK Oracle User Group (and in particular by Michelle Ericsson) and by the deputy chairs, Gordon D. Brown, Neil Chandler and Tony Clements, our “Oracle buddy”. I then chair the meeting itself.

Chairing may not be sexy, but it is rewarding, especially when we get a good line up of talks as for this one and the registered delegate numbers are healthy. SIGs have been suffering poorer attendances of late and a high number of delegates just not turning up, which is vexing (and, I’m sorry to be blunt, bloody rude to the speakers and committee who do this for free).

I’m presenting on “Being an IT Manager” and I am trying something different. I am ditching Powerpoint and I am just going to talk. It could be a disaster.

I’ll of course let you know how it went. Alternatively, if there are still spaces, come along and witness for yourself.

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